Inhibition of Protein Kinase G Facilitates the Consolidation of Fear Extinction Open Access

Zimmermann, Kelsey Sage (2010)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/pk02cb18j?locale=en
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Abstract


Abstract
Inhibition of Protein Kinase G Facilitates the Consolidation of Fear Extinction
By Kelsey S. Zimmermann

Previous studies have reported that the activation of PKG by cGMP is necessary
for the successful acquisition and consolidation of fear memories. However, little
definitive information is available on whether or not the acquisition of fear extinction is
similarly affected by exogenously affecting PKG activation. To this end, we chose to
explore the effect of administering the PKG inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS or the PKG
activator 8-Br-cGMP into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of fear conditioned mice
immediately after they completed extinction training. When tested 24 hours later, the
animals that received the activator showed extinction levels similar to vehicle controls,
but those that were given the inhibitor exhibited significantly less fear to the conditioned
stimulus (CS) when compared to the vehicle group, indicating that there exists a
facilitatory effect of PKG inhibition on extinction. These data suggest that PKG
activation may be critical for the maintenance fear memories; that inhibition of PKG may
be important during the consolidation of extinction of fear; and that inhibiting PKG might
be a novel therapeutic approach to enhancing extinction in fear-related disorders.

Table of Contents



Table of Contents
Introduction………………………………………………………….…………..….…1
Methods and Materials……………………….………………………………………10
Results…………………………………………………………………………………..14
Discussion…………………………………………………………..………………….16
Figure 1……………………………………………………………...………………….22
Figure 2………………………………………………………………………………….23
Figure 3………………………………………………………………………………….24
Figure 4………………………………………………………………………………….25
Figure 5………………………………………………………………………………….26
Figure 6………………………………………………………………………………….27
Figure 7………………………………………………………………………………….28
References…………………………………………………………...………………...29
Appendix...…………………………………………………………...………………...36


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