The Impact of Meat Consumption on the Urinary Concentration of Dialkyl Phosphate Metabolites Open Access

Sinatra, Jennifer Ann (2015)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/cf95jc237?locale=en
Published

Abstract

Background: Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are frequently used globally in agricultural and residential settings. Diet may contribute to chronic low-level exposure to OPs. The contribution of some dietary components, such as fruit, to OP exposure is well understood; limited previous research has identified the role of meat product consumption in OP exposure.

Methods: Data from five National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles (from 1999 - 2008) were used to conduct a retrospective cross-sectional analysis to examine the association between meat consumption and the urinary concentration of four different dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites of OPs. Using a linear regression analysis, the beta coefficients and 95% confidence intervals for meat consumption were estimated adjusting for covariates such as fruit and vegetable consumption. This analysis was also run on a subset of samples that had metabolite values above the limit of detection (LOD). A secondary analysis was conducted using logistic regression with an outcome of metabolite values either above or below the LOD. Each of these analyses was also run with and without the population weights provided in NHANES.

Results: The mean level of the sum of all DAP metabolites in the population was 160.7 nanomolar (sd = 639.8) and the mean level of meat consumption was 2.2 servings in 24 hours (sd = 2.3). Linear regression analysis showed a significant inverse association between consumption of meat and DAP metabolite levels (p = 0.0020). The association varied in significance for the individual metabolites, but the association was inverse in all cases. Logistic regression also showed an inverse association (odds ratio = 0.984), but no significance in the unweighted model (p = 0.2539).

Conclusions: Meat consumption was inversely associated with urinary DAP metabolite levels among individuals participating in the NHANES environmental chemicals subset in five NHANES cycles from 1999-2008. This may reflect residual confounding by imperfectly measured consumption of foods that are inversely related to meat consumption. Future studies should more specifically measure amounts of meat consumed while accounting for OP exposure from other specific dietary sources, and examine the effects of different types of meat (beef, pork, other preparations, etc.) on DAP levels.

Table of Contents

CHAPTER I: INTRODUCTION

Introduction and Rationale

Problem Statement

Purpose Statement

Significance Statement

Definition of Terms

CHAPTER II: REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Organophosphorus Pesticides in Meat

Organophosphorus Pesticides in Other Foods

Symptoms of Chronic Organophosphorus Pesticide Exposure

Organophosphorus Pesticide Dietary Exposure

Surveys of Organophosphorus Pesticide Metabolite Levels

Federal Regulation of Organophosphorus Pesticides

CHAPTER III: METHODOLOGY

Study Type and Source of Data

Study Population

Outcomes and Exposures

Weighting

Analysis Plan

CHAPTER IV: RESULTS

Descriptive Analysis

Table 1

Linear Regression Analysis

Table 2

Table 3

Logistic Regression Analysis

Table 4

CHAPTER V: DISCUSSION

Summary

Limitations

Conclusions

Future Directions

REFERENCES

About this Master's Thesis

Rights statement
  • Permission granted by the author to include this thesis or dissertation in this repository. All rights reserved by the author. Please contact the author for information regarding the reproduction and use of this thesis or dissertation.
School
Department
Degree
Submission
Language
  • English
Research field
Keyword
Committee Chair / Thesis Advisor
Committee Members
Partnering Agencies
Last modified

Primary PDF

Supplemental Files