Effects of Extreme Weather Events on Mental Health of Perinatal Population: Narrative Review Restricted; Files Only

Upadhyay, Saswati (Spring 2021)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/bz60cx45q?locale=pt-BR
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Abstract

Purpose: As the climate crisis intensifies, Extreme Weather Events (EWEs) are increasing in frequency and severity and include drought, flooding, hurricanes, tornados, extreme temperatures, and wildfires. EWEs are associated with significant, negative consequences that can affect the economy, cause population displacement, resulting in injury or death, and impact mental health. , Research indicates that women are more likely to suffer from climate-related mental illness than men. This gender-related predisposition, combined with the known challenges of the perinatal period, make pregnant and postpartum women an especially vulnerable population regarding EWE exposure. 

Aims and Objectives: Our aim was to evaluate the impact of EWEs on perinatal mental health through a literature search of articles published in the previous decade. The objective was to investigate the nature of the relationship between EWEs and perinatal mental health disorders (and related symptomology) along with protective factors such as interventions and programs designed to support families that have been adversely affected.

Methods: The databases utilized in this search were PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and PsychInfo; articles published between January 2010 to September 2020 were eligible for inclusion. Various combinations of search terms for mental health, extreme weather events, and mothers were utilized. After screening and eliminating those articles that did not qualify for exclusion criteria set by reviewers, 25 articles were included. 

ResultsAfter obtaining the final set of papers, the principal investigators read the articles and grouped them by primary themes. Six themes were identified: 1) EWEs and associated psychological symptoms, 2) Impacts of EWE trauma on offspring, 3) Assessment tools for EWE survivors, 4) Interventions, and coping mechanisms accessible during and after EWEs, 5) Protective factors during an EWE, and 6) Posttraumatic growth after an EWE. The results were collated and synthesized. 

Conclusions: Identifying and supporting pregnant women and new mothers who have experienced Extreme Weather Events is of major public health concern.  Lower socioeconomic status, a lack of social support, a history of mental health issues, and living in areas prone to EWEs are just a few of the risk factors for diminished mental health outcomes for disaster survivors. 

Table of Contents

Section 1: INTRODUCTION

Section 2: METHODS

Section 3: GROUPING BY THEME

Section 4: RESULTS

Section 5: DISCUSSION

Section 6: STRENGTHS AND LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

Section 7: CONCLUSIONS

Section 8: REFERENCES

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