The Effects of Natural Disasters on Infant Health: Evidence from India Open Access

Handel, Danielle (Spring 2021)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/z029p614f?locale=en
Published

Abstract

Given the rising frequency and intensity of natural disasters across the globe and particularly in developing nations, it is vital to understand the effect of climate on the health of future generations. I explore the effects of in utero exposure to tropical cyclones on birth outcomes in India by using spatial storm track data and representative demographic and health survey data. Difference-in-differences estimates indicate that exposure significantly increases neonatal and infant mortality rates, while the effect on birth weight is less clear. Heterogeneity analysis reveals that the negative consequences are most severe for those living in rural regions, evidencing the need for improved access to healthcare and stable infrastructure in India's rural areas. I highlight a combination of acute maternal stress and temporary shocks to healthcare services and infrastructure as plausible mechanisms. 

Table of Contents

1 Introduction                              1

2 Literature and context                                            5

2.1  Literature on early life shocks and health outcomes . . . . . . . . . . 6

2.2  Pathways between disasters and infant health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

2.3  The Indian economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

2.4  Healthcare infrastructure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

2.5  Tropical cyclones in India . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

3 Data                                                            12

3.1  Data on storms and cyclones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

3.2  Data on birth outcomes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

3.2.1 Mortality data  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

3.2.2 Birth weight data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

4 Identification strategy                                           16

4.1  Mortality specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

4.2  Birth weight specification  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

5 Results 19

5.1  Mortality results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

5.2  Birth weight results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

5.3  Event studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

6 Heterogeneity analysis 24

6.1  District-level heterogeneity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

6.2  Individual-level heterogeneity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

7 Robustness 28

7.1  Fertility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

7.2  Fetal mortality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

7.3  Lee bounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

7.4  Varying measures of exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

7.5  Varying estimations of average length of gestation . . . . . . . . . . . 31

8 Conclusions 32

9 Tables 43

10 Figures 54

About this Honors Thesis

Rights statement
  • Permission granted by the author to include this thesis or dissertation in this repository. All rights reserved by the author. Please contact the author for information regarding the reproduction and use of this thesis or dissertation.
School
Department
Degree
Submission
Language
  • English
Research field
Keyword
Committee Chair / Thesis Advisor
Committee Members
Last modified

Primary PDF

Supplemental Files