Pilot of a sexual and reproductive health (SRH) tool for the Inter-Agency Working Group (IAWG) on Reproductive Health in Crisis. Open Access

Kasozi, Ramla Namisango (2015)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/x633f1838?locale=en
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Abstract

Background: IAWG is a broad-based, highly collaborative coalition that works to expand and strengthen access to quality SRH services for people affected by conflict and natural disaster. IAWG global reviews highlighted various gaps and challenges facing SRH in humanitarian settings. One identified gap was the need for effective data collection and a forum to share information in order to advance evidence-based strategies for SRH.

Purpose: The purpose of this special studies project was to develop, implement, and analyze a pilot data collection tool on SRH research conducted by IAWG's Data, Information, and Research Sub-Working Group (DIR-SWG).

Methods: An initial data collection tool drafted by IAWG's DIR-SWG and was further developed in collaboration with IAWG members. The refined tool was then translated into an online survey using Survey Monkey. The survey was sent to a total of 68 active IAWG members, representing 27 organizations and two independent consultants. Information was gathered on SRH research projects initiated, ongoing, or completed since January 2010. In-depth interviews (IDI) were conducted among five IAWG members using an in-depth interview guide. The interviews focused on: factors that drive SRH research; why certain agencies are not involved in SRH research; identifying the need for a tool to collect and distribute research being done on SRH in humanitarian settings.

Results: Of the 27 organizations we obtained information from 16 (59% response rate). Of the 28 SRH research projects since January 2010 most dealt with family planning (50.0 %), gender based violence (39.3%) and maternal health (35.7 %). Less research was done on post-abortion care (10.7%) and safe abortion care (3.6%). The IDI narratives identified funding as an important driving factor that determines SRH research and respondents agreed a database can potentially provide a repository of SRH research.

Recommendations: IAWG DIR-SWG should take the lead in building and maintaining of the database using Microsoft Access. Unique strategies are needed to promote the database's utilization within IAWG so that it is utilized. Public health implications of having such a database is that it will provide an important source of the current state of SRH research in humanitarian settings

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABSTRACT..................................................................................................................................................................................2

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.................................................................................................................................................................3

ACRONYM LIST. ........................................................................................................................................................................... 6

CHAPTER ONE: LITERATURE REVIEW ............................................................................................................................................ 7

Key SRH Resources........................................................................................................................................................................13

Inter-Agency Field Manual on Reproductive Health in Humanitarian Settings.............................................................................................13

Minimum Initial Service Package......................................................................................................................................................14

Inter-Agency Working Group.............................................................................................................................................................15

Special Studies Project ....................................................................................................................................................................20

CHAPTER TWO: METHODS .. .......................................................................................................................................................... 21

CHAPTER THREE: RESULTS . .......................................................................................................................................................... 24

Quantitative Data...........................................................................................................................................................................24

Qualitative Data.............................................................................................................................................................................30

CHAPTER FOUR: DISCUSSION .. ..................................................................................................................................................... 35

The Study......................................................................................................................................................................................35

Recommendations...........................................................................................................................................................................40

CONCLUSION................................................................................................................................................................................44

REFERENCES................................................................................................................................................................................ 46

APPENDICES.................................................................................................................................................................................49

Appendix 1: IAWG Organizations and Members......................................................................................................................................49

Appendix 2: Survey Monkey................................................................................................................................................................52

Appendix 3: In-depth Interview Guide...................................................................................................................................................56

TABLE OF FIGURES

Figure 1: IASC Cluster Approach………………………………………………………….11

Figure 2: Research projects done in sexual and reproductive health (SRH) in crisis situations (i.e. citing projects initiated, ongoing, or completed) since January 2010………………………………………………………………………………26

Figure 3: Research conducted in SRH in crisis situations (i.e. citing projects initiated, ongoing, or completed) since January 2010……………………………………..28

Figure 4: Research methods used in SRH in crisis situations (i.e. citing projects initiated, ongoing, or completed) since January 2010……………………………………..29

TABLE OF TABLES

Table 1: Eligible respondents by response category………………………………………24

Table 2: Reported projects since January 2010 in specific SRH research topics per organization that completed the online survey…………………………………..26

Table 3: Description on the in-depth interview participants………………………………30

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