An Evaluation of Save the Children's Menstrual Hygiene Management Training Program in Nepal Open Access

Kasturi, Raghuraj (2017)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/w66344367?locale=en
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Abstract

Program Background: In 2013, Save the Children partnered with local Non-Governmental Organizations to implement a menstrual hygiene management training program for teachers in Nepal. The training program's purpose was to reduce absenteeism among female students in schools by training teachers to address students' menstrual hygiene management needs. Absenteeism among female students was assumed to be the result of the students' inability to manage menstruation at school, comfortably.

Methods: This study used a cross-sectional design to evaluate Save the Children's menstrual hygiene management training program in two districts. Key informant interviews were conducted with trained teachers and focus group discussions were conducted with male and female students at schools with trained teachers. In addition, structured observations were conducted to assess school facilities to determine their impact on girls' menstrual hygiene management needs. Data collected were then analyzed to evaluate the training program's impact on students' menstrual hygiene management needs.

Findings: The evaluation revealed that there were areas in students' knowledge and skill that influenced their ability to manage menstruations. When evaluating students' knowledge, there remained knowledge gaps on the menstrual cycle, students were dealing with conflicting discourses surround menstruation knowledge, they preferred natural remedies to manage dysmenorrhea and that other community organizations played a role in education. Most importantly, the knowledge helped empower teachers and students. When evaluating students' skills, schools lacked resources to properly demonstrate management strategies, girls preferred disposable pads over homemade pads, and teachers played a critical role in girls' management strategies. In addition, issues were disocvered with the schools' facilities that impacted girls' ability to manage their menstruations at school.

Recommendations: Recommendations were made to better improve the training program by providing knowledge to address menstrual cycle knowledge gaps, partner with other community organizations to better educate students, reinforce that pain medication is safe to use, and train teachers to better support students' menstrual hygiene management needs by fostering better relations with the students. Most importantly, this study revealed that teachers should be trained on how to organize and facilitate peer support groups for girls within the school.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Executive Summary………………………………………………………………... 1

MHM Training Program Background……………………………………………... 4

Overview of Menstruation Studies in Nepal………………………………………. 8

Methods……………………………………………………………………………. 19

Findings……………………………………………………………………………. 29

Education Component……………………………………………………… 30

Skill Component…………………………………………………………… 42

School Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Facilities…………………………. 49

Implications and Recommendations……………………………………………….. 53

Appendix A: Structured WASH Facility Observation Form………………………. 58

References………………………………………………………………………….. 63

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