BREAST CANCER IN MEN: DOES HISPANIC ETHNICITY PREDICT RECEIPT OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY? Open Access

Cole, Lavonne (Spring 2018)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/vt150j25g?locale=en
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Abstract

 

Despite periods of increasing incidence and years of documented morbidity and mortality, breast cancer in men remains under-researched in the United States. Little is known about the factors that predict receipt of post-surgery adjuvant therapy prescribe to men diagnosed with breast cancer. The purpose of this research was to explore whether Hispanic ethnicity was a predictor to receiving adjuvant radiotherapy in Hispanic men diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States from 2004 to 2013.

 

 

 

Methods: Data for the study were extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance (NCI), Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. A retrospective review of the data collected on 3,051 men including 213 Hispanic men was conducted.  Multiple Regression analyses were performed to test the hypothesis that Hispanic ethnicity predicts receipt of radiotherapy.

 

 

 

Results: Hispanic ethnicity was found to be not significant, as a predictor of receipt of radiotherapy (P = 0.501) in the sample of men diagnosed with breast cancer and reported to the (NCI), Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program from 2004 to 2013.

 

 

 

Summary: The prospect that Hispanic ethnicity may not influence receipt of radiotherapy compared to non-Hispanic whites and blacks is an important finding given that previous studies have described differences in receipt of various adjuvant therapies in minority groups including Hispanics. However, the small number of Hispanic men receiving radiotherapy in this study (48) limits generalization of these results.

 

Table of Contents

 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

Chapter I:  Introduction. 1

 

Introduction and Rationale. 1

 

Problem Statement 3

 

Theoretical Framework. 3

 

Purpose Statement 3

 

Research Question. 4

 

Significance Statement 4

 

Definition of Terms. 4

 

Chapter II:  Review of Literature. 5

 

Introduction. 5

 

Review of literature. 6

 

Chapter III:  Methodology. 13

 

Introduction. 13

 

Population and Sample. 14

 

Research Design. 14

 

Procedures. 14

 

Instruments. 15

 

Data Analysis Methodology. 15

 

Chapter IV: Results. 16

 

Introduction. 16

 

Key Findings. 16

 

Other Findings. 17

 

Summary. 17

 

Chapter V:  Conclusions, Implications and Recommendation. 18

 

Introduction. 18

 

Summary of Study. 18

 

Limitations. 19

 

Implications. 20

 

Recommendations. 20

 

Conclusions. 21

 

Works Cited. 22

 

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