Accreditation Preparedness and Health IT Infrastructure & Utilization: An Assessment of U.S. Local Health Departments Open Access

Flores, Aisha L. (2016)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/s7526c656?locale=en
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Abstract

The ability to attain and use information is critical to designing, establishing, and implementing public health activities. (NACCHO, 2013) Health information is the lifeblood of an effective and sustainable public health program. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 (ref - consumer) recognized this and allocated billions of dollars to hospitals and health care providers. One of the principal objectives of the HITECH Act is to allow the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to facilitate and hasten the adoption and use of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information exchanges (HIEs). LHD's are facing challenges related to shrinking budgets and new requirements related to the Affordable Care Act and the HITECH Act. It is also imperative that federal funding is made available to foster the development and utilization of HIT and meaningful use within the nation's local health departments. Partnerships and collaborations with community providers along with funding and technical assistance from federal entities to gain HIT capacity and participate in the national voluntary accreditation process will enable LHDs to utilize health care data effectively, mitigate health disparities and improve population health outcomes. While there is ongoing research and limited examination of the topic of public health informatics (PHI) and the role of PHI in the accreditation preparedness of LHDs, this study investigates whether public health informatics implementations can be associated with accreditation preparedness amongst us local health departments based on the NACCHO 2013 LHD national survey. A correlation analysis of the informatics infrastructure score with accreditation preparedness scores are used to identify any associations. The results are meaningful in both areas of public health informatics and health department accreditation in setting priorities for resource distribution as it relates to local health departments going through the accreditation process.

Table of Contents

CHAPTER I | INTRODUCTION

· Public Health Informatics in Local Health Departments

· National Public Health Accreditation

CHAPTER 2 | LITERATURE REVIEW

CHAPTER 3 | METHODS

CHAPTER 4 | FINDINGS

CHAPTER 5 | DISCUSSION

· Conclusions

· Limitations

· Recommendations

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