The Effects of Intimate Partner Violence on a Child's Cognitive, Social, and Behavioral Development in Jordan Open Access

Bigham, Jane (2011)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/s1784k86g?locale=en
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Abstract

The Effects of Intimate Partner Violence on a Child's Cognitive, Social, and Behavioral
Development in Jordan

Author: Jane Bigham

Thesis Advisor: Dr. Kathryn Yount


Background: Research shows that childhood exposure to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is
detrimental to a child's social, cognitive, and behavioral development; however, the majority of
research is conducted in western countries. For the first time, the 2007 Jordan Demographic
Health Survey (JDHS) included a module on domestic violence as well as childhood
development allowing for research on the association between maternal exposure to IPV and
childhood development in a non-western, lower middle income setting.

Objective:
This study examines the association between maternal exposure to IPV and six
measures of childhood development through the use of the 2007 Jordan Demographic Health
Survey.

Methods:
The data for this analysis was drawn from the 2007 Jordan Demographic Health
Survey (JDHS), a nationally representative cross-sectional study of households, which employed
a two-stage stratified sample design. Univariate analyses were conducted initially to examine the
distribution and completeness of the variables. Logistic regression was employed for binary
outcomes to estimate the unadjusted and adjusted associations of measures for violence with
child development.

Results: In this study, maternal exposure to physical, sexual or emotional intimate partner
violence was associated with a lowered ability for a child to recognize his/her own name; to
count over ten; to exercise proper hygiene behavior; and to manage disagreements with friends in
a positive way.

Discussion:
This study was the first to examine the association of maternal exposure to IPV
with childhood development in the non-western setting of Jordan. The results confirm previous
findings in western countries that exposure to IPV is negatively associated with childhood
development. One limitation of this study is that the survey may not fully capture the frequency
or magnitude of IPV in Jordan. The findings from this research can be used to inform policies
regarding intimate partner violence and child welfare.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Chapter 1:
Literature Review 1


Chapter 2: Manuscript 10

Chapter 3: Conclusions and Discussion 36

References 40

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