Mother-Infant Synchrony and the Relationship Between Prenatal Depression and Infant Emotion Regulation Open Access

Halperin, Meeka (Fall 2017)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/r781wg024?locale=en
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Abstract

 

Accumulating evidence suggests that mothers’ prenatal depression predicts infants’ emotion dysregulation. We examined mother-infant positive affect and gaze synchrony as potential moderators and mediators in this relationship. In a population of mothers who were at risk for prenatal depression, given their history of a major depressive episode, we examined synchrony when infants were 3-months old and behavioral (temperament) and physiological emotion regulation when those infants were 6-months of age. We found that when gaze synchrony was high, there was a significant negative relationship between prenatal depression and infant behavioral emotion regulation. However, gaze synchrony did not significantly moderate the relationship between prenatal depression and infant physiological emotion regulation. Positive affect synchrony did not significantly moderate the relationship between prenatal depression and infant behavioral or physiological emotion regulation. There was no evidence of positive affect or gaze synchrony mediating the relationship between prenatal depression and infant behavioral and/or physiological emotion regulation. We discuss limitations and strengths, as well as important next steps in this line of studies. 

Table of Contents

 

Introduction .........................................................................1

Method...............................................................................12

Results ...............................................................................18

Discussion ..........................................................................22

References ..........................................................................31

Tables and Figures ................................................................41 

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