Social and Behavioral Precursors of Conversion to Psychosis: AnInvestigation of Youth at Risk for Psychosis Open Access

Simeonova, Diana Iorgova (2009)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/qz20st25n?locale=en
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Abstract

Abstract This study explored social and behavioral problems in 122 adolescents ages 12 to 18 with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD), other personality disorders (OPD), and non- psychiatric controls (NC) at baseline and at one year follow-up assessments. Cross- sectional and longitudinal examination of social and behavioral precursors of conversion to psychosis was conducted with a subset of 14 high-risk Converted and 27 high-risk Non-Converted adolescents. Conversion to psychosis was defined as conversion to any Axis I schizophrenia spectrum disorder or affective disorder with psychotic features. SPD adolescents showed a Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) behavioral profile with more social and behavioral impairments compared to OPD and NC adolescents. At one year follow-up assessment, compared to the Non-Converted subjects, the Converted subjects manifested significantly higher scores on all prodromal symptom scales of the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS). There were no differences in social and behavioral problems as a function of conversion status. The findings supported the relationship between positive family history of psychosis or affective disorders and behavioral problems, and were indicative of constitutional vulnerability underlying the risk for psychosis. The CBCL parent-report scale did not show promise as an alternative or adjunctive predictor of conversion to psychosis in high-risk SPD adolescents. The findings provided support for ratings from the SIPS structured interview as more sensitive predictors of conversion to psychosis in high-risk SPD adolescents.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents Introduction...........................................................1

Method.................................................................40 Results.................................................................45

Discussion.............................................................70

References............................................................85

Tables..................................................................105

Figures.................................................................116

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