From Niya to the Ballot Box: An Examination of Post-Colonial Moroccan Feminism Open Access

Buettner, Alexandria (2017)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/qr46r171f?locale=en
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Abstract

Post-colonial Moroccan feminism is the result of a variety of influences on the country and her women. Of these influence, Islam is perhaps the one most closely tied with Morocco with regards to her political and cultural identity. The Moroccan monarchy derives its legitimacy from Islam and the King holds the title "Commander of the Faithful." Political changes in Morocco include the 2004 Mudawwana reforms which brought protesters to the street on both sides of the issue, many using Islam in their arguments. This is only one of the ways that Moroccan women have come into the public sphere in previously unseen ways. Female political involvement has increased as Moroccan women win seats in Parliament as a result of the quota system. Morocco's leftist party has a woman as its head. The role of women in the market, or suq, is also adapting and changing as the concept of niya become a thing of the past and a reason for nostalgia. All of these influence Moroccan feminism. Just because Morocco is a Muslim country, does not mean that all feminism is Islamic in nature. This generic labeling of all Moroccan feminism is inaccurate and misguided. There are a variety of feminist trends occurring in Morocco presently. These feminist trends can be categorized into three categories called Islamist feminism, Islamic feminism, and secular feminism. These categories are based on the ways that each trend uses Islam and its relationship to the religion.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Author's Note...................................................................................2

Safe Feminists.............................................................................5

Introduction.....................................................................................8

Islam and Moroccan Women...............................................................11

Morocco's Muslim History..............................................................12

Islamic Feminism: A Misleading Label.............................................16

The Moroccan King as "Commander of the Faithful"..........................21

Politics in Morocco............................................................................23

Introduction to Moroccan Politics...................................................24

The Monarchy.............................................................................25

The Mudawwana.........................................................................28

Youth in Morocco: Singledom and Education in a Changing World......35

Moroccan Women in the Public Sphere................................................42

The Princess Lalla Salma..............................................................42

Moroccan Female Political Participation...........................................44

Women in the Market........................................................................49

The Suq and the Transformation of the Countryside.........................49

Niya and the Women of the Suq....................................................52

Moroccan Feminism.....................................................................55

Feminist Trends in Morocco...............................................................55

Conclusion......................................................................................64

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