Development of a Recall Memory Test for Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Open Access

Basile, Benjamin Michael (2009)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/qb98mf57c?locale=en
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Abstract

Abstract
Human memory can be assessed with two types of tests: 1) recognition tests, in which
subjects judge whether a current stimulus occurred previously, and 2) recall tests, in
which subjects reproduce a previous stimulus in its absence. In contrast, there is a lack of
comparable recall tests in nonhuman animals. Here, we describe the development of a
touchscreen-based, shape reproduction task for rhesus monkeys that is similar to recall
tests in humans. At study, monkeys saw a simple shape composed of two colored boxes
located on a 5x5 grid. At test, one of the two boxes appeared in a new grid location.
Monkeys earned food for reproducing the studied stimulus by touching the appropriate
grid location for the second box. Performance was significantly above chance levels. In
comparison with a recognition test matched for chance rate, monkeys showed similar
accuracy and response latency for the two tests. This contrasts with human recall tests,
which are normally harder than recognition tests. Possible reasons for this discrepancy
are addressed and a new recognition test is proposed.

Table of Contents

Contents Introduction Familiarity and recollection
Recall in nonhumans Recall training Method
Subjects
Apparatus
Procedure
Accuracy training
Recall training phase 1
Recall training phase 2
Recall training phase 3
Recall training phase 4
Recall training phase 5 Recall training phase 6 Data analysis Results Comparison with recognition Method Subjects and apparatus Procedure

Recognition training with clipart

Recognition training with box shapes

Comparison with recall test

Data analysis Results Discussion Group findings Limitations and future directions Individual findings Conclusion References

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