The Association between Maternal Vitamin Use and Preterm Birth in 24 States, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2009-2010 Open Access

Johnston, Emily Osteen (2013)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/pz50gw24h?locale=en
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Abstract

Abstract

The Association between Maternal Vitamin Use and Preterm Birth in 24 States,

Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2009-2010

By Emily Osteen Johnston

OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence and association between maternal vitamin use one month prior to pregnancy and early (<34 weeks) or late (34-36 weeks) preterm birth by race/ethnicity.

METHODS: Data from the 2009-2010 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), a population-based surveillance initiative of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state health departments was used for the analysis. The states (n=24) included in the analysis maintained a weighted response rate of ≥65% and included a question from the PRAMS questionnaire that assessed maternal vitamin use one month prior to pregnancy. The study included women aged ≥18 years with a singleton birth (n= 57,348). Chi-square tests were performed to examine maternal and infant characteristics and logistic regression models were used to determine odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for vitamin use as a predictor of preterm birth, adjusting for maternal race, parity, education, age, marital status, Medicaid recipient, WIC recipient, smoking status, and prepregnancy BMI.

RESULTS: Overall, 55% of women reported no vitamin use in the month prior to pregnancy while 37% reported using vitamins ≥4 times per week. After adjustment for covariates, there was no significant association between maternal vitamin use one month prior to pregnancy and early preterm birth. The association between maternal vitamin use 1-3 times per week and ≥4 times per week and late preterm birth was significant only among American Indian, Alaska Native, or Hawaiian women (aOR: 0.39 95% CI 0.20, 0.76; aOR: 2.49 95% CI 1.18, 5.24).

DISCUSSION: The prevalence of vitamin use one month prior to pregnancy reported in this study was consistent with previous research. Maternal vitamin use one month prior to pregnancy was not significantly associated with early preterm birth and maternal race/ethnicity moderated the relation between maternal vitamin use and late preterm birth.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Chapter One: Introduction..................................................................1

Chapter Two: Literature Review...........................................................4

Chapter Three: Methodology..............................................................18

Chapter Four: Results.......................................................................25

Chapter Five: Discussion...................................................................36

References.....................................................................................40

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