Associations of physical activity and television viewing with various domains of child and adolescent health Open Access

Barradas, Danielle Thompson (2009)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/pr76f415f?locale=en
Published

Abstract


Nearly one in five youth in the US is overweight. Regular physical activity and
limited television viewing are important behaviors for health, but few studies have related
physical activity and TV viewing to changes in health among youth, or assessed the impact of
sports participation as a means of acquiring physical activity. In this dissertation, relationships
between weight maintenance, weight gain, and weight loss and changes in cardiovascular disease
(CVD) risk factors were assessed. Associations between moderate and vigorous physical activity
(MVPA) and TV viewing (TV) and changes in body mass index (BMI), percent body fat (PBF),
and CVD risk factors were also examined. Differences between sports participants and non-
participants were described with regard to weight-related perceptions, intentions, and practices;
correlates of weight-related intentions and weight-control practices in sports participants were
assessed.
MVPA was not associated with changes in BMI, PBF, blood pressure or blood lipids;
TV was positively related to increases in BMI and PBF. Estimates of MVPA and TV did
not vary among BMI maintainers, losers, and gainers, but greater increases in the sum of CVD
risk factors and larger declines in HDL were observed among gainers, relative to maintainers.
Independent of changes in BMI, TV was positively associated with increases in LDL.
Sports participants were more likely to meet MVPA and TV guidelines than non-
participants. Disordered weight-control practices did not differ between sports participants and
non-participants, but intention to gain weight was more common among male sports participants
than non-participants. Receiving weight-related advice from a peer or adult was associated with
increased odds of weight-gaining intention and using dietary supplements among male sports
participants. In females, weight-loss and weight-maintenance intentions were influenced by
receiving advice from a peer and adult. Perceived weight influenced intentions more than
measured BMI in this subgroup.
These findings suggest that limiting TV to prevent excess increases in BMI and adiposity
could have implications for reducing undesirable changes in CVD risk measures during youth.
Participation in sports may be a viable mechanism to limit TV as well as provide a platform for
the discussion of healthy weight-related perceptions, intentions, and practices.

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.....................................................................
i
LIST OF TABLES............................................................................
ii
LIST OF FIGURES............................................................................
iii
CHAPTER
1 INTRODUCTION............................................................
1
References.....................................................................
5
2 LITERATURE
REVIEW...................................................
7
References.....................................................................
19
3 METHODS....................................................................
27
General
considerations.......................................................
27
Project
HeartBeat!................................................................................
28

Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)......................................
34

Muscogee County data.......................................................
37
References.....................................................................
43
4
ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN CHANGES IN MEASURES OF

BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND

TELEVISION VIEWING AMONG CHILDREN AND

ADOLESCENTS: PROJECT HEARTBEAT! ...........................
45
Abstract........................................................................
45
Introduction....................................................................
47
Methods........................................................................
48
Results..........................................................................
52
Discussion......................................................................
55
Tables
and
Figures............................................................
59
References.....................................................................
61


About this thesis

Rights statement
  • Permission granted by the author to include this thesis or dissertation in this repository. All rights reserved by the author. Please contact the author for information regarding the reproduction and use of this thesis or dissertation.
School
Department
Subfield / Discipline
Degree
Submission
Language
  • English
Research field
Keyword
Committee Chair / Thesis Advisor
Committee Members
Last modified

Primary PDF

Supplemental Files