Religiosity as a Predictor for Individual Contraceptive Behavior among U.S. Women 公开

Benka- Coker, Akinwande (2011)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/pr76f348s?locale=zh
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Abstract


Abstract

Religiosity as a Predictor for Individual Contraceptive Behavior Among U.S. Women
By
Akinwande Benka-Coker
The socioeconomic and public health significance of family planning and contraception are
noted as an important achievement in 20th century public health. However, almost half of the
all pregnancies in the U.S. are unplanned. Certain factors have been identified as determinants
for effective contraceptive behavior, amongst which religiosity is believed to play a significant
role. To understand this relationship, the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) data is
used to predict the relationship between religiosity and contraceptive use and choice.
This study employs complex survey methods to test two separate logistic models, controlling
for demographic and socioeconomic covariates, with contraceptive use and choice (condoms
versus pills) as the outcome variables and in both cases, a composite measure of religiosity
(religiosity index) as the primary exposure.
Results indicate that an estimated 38.2 million women of reproductive age, at risk for
unintended pregnancy, were contracepting, with pills, sterilization and condoms the main
methods being used. Multivariate modeling revealed that higher religiosity was associated with
less contraception, but this relationship was non-significant. There is also no significant
association between religiosity and the method choice (condoms versus pills).Women's marital
status and parity were also associated with the use of contraceptives.
Among women at risk of unintended pregnancy, religiosity levels do not significantly predict the
contraceptive behavior (use and choice) of these women.


Religiosity as a Predictor for Individual Contraceptive Behavior among U.S. Women
By
Akinwande Benka-Coker
Bachelor of Medicine; Bachelor of Surgery
University of Benin, Nigeria
2007
Thesis Committee Chair: Dr. Michael Kramer MS, PhD
A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the
Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of
Master of Public Health
in Epidemiology
2011



Table of Contents



TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION









1
Hypothesis









4

BACKGROUND










5
Introduction








6
Religion, Religious affiliation and Religiosity




9

Religiosity and Contraceptive Use






11


Negative Association






11

Positive Association






12

No Association







14
Religiosity and Contraceptive Choice





16

METHODS










18

Inclusion/Exclusion







18
Definition of Exposure







18
Definition of Outcome







20
Additional Covariates







20
Analysis









21

RESULTS










23

Descriptive Analysis







23

Regression Analysis







24

DISCUSSION










26

Study Strengths and Limitations






28

Conclusion









29

Future Direction








30

REFERENCES










31





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