Negotiating Unacceptable Behavior: Southeastern Indians and the Evolution of Bilateral Regulation on the Southern Colonial Frontier Open Access

Sylvester, Beverly S. (2009)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/nv935358m?locale=en
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Abstract

Abstract
Negotiating Unacceptable Behavior:
Southeastern Indians and the Evolution of
Bilateral Regulation on the Southern Colonial Frontier
By Beverly S. Sylvester

When Indians and Englishmen came into contact on the southern colonial frontier,
they brought with them conflicting ideas regarding behavior that was acceptable or -
more important - unacceptable. "Unacceptable behavior" is a broad term, which
encompasses everything from military invasion to threat to crime to insult to excessive
toleration. As trade and other contacts between Indians and colonists multiplied, each
discovered more and more ways that the "other" provoked them. Acceptable behavior on
one side of the frontier that was unacceptable on the other side inevitably led to reaction
and confrontation. Unless they were willing to fight, both were obliged to engage with
the other to relieve the pressure. This study explores this clash of behavioral ideals on the
southern frontier, from ideological origins, to actual conflicts, to eventual "resolutions" in
the intercultural context of the frontier zone.

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS


LIST OF TABLES

LIST OF FIGURES

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

PREFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1. SOUTH CAROLINA, 1670-1715 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

2. SOUTH CAROLINA, 1716-1732 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

3. GEORGIA AND SOUTH CAROLINA, 1733-1754 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

4. GEORGIA AND SOUTH CAROLINA, 1755-1763 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

5. GEORGIA AND WEST AND EAST FLORIDA, 1764-1776 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154

6. MISBEHAVIOR TRENDS IN THE LOWER SOUTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203

CONCLUSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237

APPENDIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255

BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267

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