Qualitative Analysis of Self-Compassion and Its Relationship to Self-Report Rating Measures of Self-Compassion Open Access

Chae, Si Woo (Spring 2018)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/nv935287v?locale=en
Published

Abstract

With the rise of self-compassion interventions as a novel approach to promote psychological well-being of individuals, a few studies have implemented self-compassion interventions to address psychological problems such as body image concerns (Albertson, Neff, Dill-Shackleford, 2014; Toole & Craighead, 2016). However, none of the studies attempted to analyze the self-compassionate letters that are often used in self-compassion intervention. The present study devised a coding scheme based on a qualitative content analysis of self-compassionate letters that indicated the degree of understanding of self-compassion. This study examined the relationships between two standard self-report measures, the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) and Fear of Self-Compassion (FSC) and scores reflecting the level of self-compassion found in self-compassionate letter samples. The results indicated a significant negative correlation between the two self-report measures but no significant relationships between those measures and the letter scores. The findings suggest that assessing the level of self-compassion expressed in a writing sample which was written after exposure to psychoeducational information on self-compassion may be a useful indication of the degree to which an individual was able to learn and apply the constructs as instructed, i.e. a manipulation check. However, for many individuals, even the brief exposure to the psychoeducational information may have impacted the level of self-compassion they were able to reflect in their letter. Thus, their letter scores may not have accurately reflected their initial level of self-compassion, which would explain the low correlation with the pretest self-reports of self-compassion. The lack of correlation between the letter scores and the pre-post measures of self-compassion suggests that differential ability to incorporate psychoeducational information into a self-compassionate letter does not predict who will benefit more from the intervention. Results support prior findings that even brief exposure to the concepts of self-compassion improves self-reported self-compassion.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

I.                Introduction………………………………………………………     1

II.              Methods………………………………………………………….      8

III.            Results…………………………………………………………...     12

IV.            Discussion………………………………………………………..    16

V.              References………………………………………………………..     21

VI.           Appendices……………………………………………………….     25

VII.     Table 1 ............................................................................................     29

VIII.    Figure 1............................................................................................    30

About this Honors Thesis

Rights statement
  • Permission granted by the author to include this thesis or dissertation in this repository. All rights reserved by the author. Please contact the author for information regarding the reproduction and use of this thesis or dissertation.
School
Department
Subfield / Discipline
Degree
Submission
Language
  • English
Research field
Keyword
Committee Chair / Thesis Advisor
Committee Members
Last modified

Primary PDF

Supplemental Files