Women’s Precarity in the Late Colonial and Postcolonial Congo Open Access

Standifer, Lauren (Fall 2017)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/nk322d33s?locale=en
Published

Abstract

This thesis examines how the status and precarity of women changed during the late colonial and early colonial period in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The first chapter focuses on Congolese perceptions of domestic violence, studied through the lens of colonial scholars who interviewed subjects about their views on marriage. These scholars situated descriptions of violence and fear within colonial ideologies in ways that minimized, concealed and misdescribed violence. The second chapter studies how colonial interventions in and presumptions about plural marriage, sex work and monogamous marriage left many women with fewer rights and protections in intimate partner situations. This study calls for a re-examination of how scholars discuss women’s situations and experiences of vulnerability in African contexts.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

 

Introduction: Marital Chastisement, or Being Beaten with a Lamp…………………. p. 1

 

 

Part I: “Girls Are Afraid Of...” Psychology and Domestic Cruelty in the Late Colonial Congo …………………………………………………………………………..p. 9

 

 

 

Part II: “For you, there was only marriage”: The increasing vulnerability of female romantic partners under colonialism ………………………………………….p. 35

 

 

Conclusion …………………………………………………………………………...p. 61

 

 

Bibliography ………………………………………………………………………….p 63

 

 

 

 

About this Master's Thesis

Rights statement
  • Permission granted by the author to include this thesis or dissertation in this repository. All rights reserved by the author. Please contact the author for information regarding the reproduction and use of this thesis or dissertation.
School
Department
Degree
Submission
Language
  • English
Research field
Keyword
Committee Chair / Thesis Advisor
Committee Members
Last modified

Primary PDF

Supplemental Files