Improving Self-Efficacy in Chronically-Ill individuals: A First Look at the Effectiveness of a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program in Southeast Missouri Open Access

Obisesan, Olawunmi (Fall 2017)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/n296wz12m?locale=en
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Abstract

Self-management programs enhance self-efficacy in the adoption and sustenance of healthier behaviors among chronically-ill individuals. They provides the opportunity for patients to play an active role in managing their conditions, ultimately promoting coping-independence and better health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) in improving perceived self-efficacy in self-management behaviors among a random sample of individuals who live with chronic diseases in Southeast Missouri. Secondary data analysis was conducted on 46 adult participants. Data were collected at Week 1 (baseline) and Week 6 (post-CDSMP). A dependent t test was conducted to examine outcome measurements related to perceived self-efficacy in seven chronic disease self-management behaviors. The mean age of participants was 55.02 (±14.639) years; the majority was female (67.4%), White (73.9%), and 100% reported at least one chronic disease. A dependent t test analysis indicated the CDSMP was effective in improving perceived self-efficacy in all seven self-management behaviors: Managing condition (p = 0.005, 95% CI = -1.462, -.277), eating healthier (p = 0.002, 95% CI = -1.520, -.349), being physically active (p , managing stress (p , making treatment decisions (p 95% CI = -2.475, -1.134), taking medications (p , and managing pain (p hold promise for better disease control and improved health outcomes among chronically-ill individuals.

Table of Contents

 

Table of Contents

Chapter I: Introduction. 1

Introduction and Rationale. 1

The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program.. 2

Problem Statement 3

Theoretical Framework. 4

Purpose Statement 5

Research Questions and Hypotheses. 6

Research Questions (RQ) 6

Hypotheses. 6

Significance. 8

Definition of Terms. 9

Chapter II: Review of the Literature. 11

Introduction. 11

Literature Review Strategy. 11

Review of Literature Related to Chronic Disease Self-Management 12

Review of Literature related to the Stanford Model of the CDSMP. 13

Review of Literature Related to Theoretical Framework: Self-Efficacy Theory. 15

Review of Literature Related to Healthcare Savings. 16

Chapter III: Methodology. 19

Introduction. 19

Purpose of Study. 19

Objectives of the Study. 19

Sample Characteristics. 20

Research Design and Methodology. 21

Data Collection Procedures. 21

Operationalization and Measurements of Variables. 23

Instrumentation. 23

Data Analysis. 24

Chapter IV: Results. 25

Introduction. 25

Key Findings. 25

Correlations. 26

Summary. 37

Chapter V: Conclusions, Implications, and Recommendations. 38

Introduction. 38

Summary of Study. 38

Limitations. 39

Implications. 40

Recommendations. 41

Conclusion. 42

References. 44

Appendix A.. 56

 

 

List of Tables

Table 1. G*Power Statistical Power Computation for Sample Size.................................. 21

 

Table 2. Dependent t-Test Table Suggesting Changes in Perceived Self-Efficacy in all Seven Areas Pre- and Post CDSMP; N = 46.................................................................................................... 27

 

Table 3. Dependent t-Test Table Suggesting Changes in Perceived Self-Efficacy in all Seven Areas Pre- and Post CDSMP; N = 46.................................................................................................... 36

 

 

List of Figures

Figure 1. Concept of influences on perceived self-efficacy based on the conceptions of Bandura   5

 

Figure 2. Mean changes in perceived self-efficacy in managing condition pre- and post CDSMP, p = 0.005          28

 

Figure 3. Mean changes in perceived self-efficacy in eating healthier pre- and post CDSMP, p = 0.002     29

 

Figure 4. Mean changes in perceived self-efficacy in being physically active pre- and post CDSMP, p < 0.001     30

 

Figure 5. Mean changes in perceived self-efficacy in managing stress pre- and post CDSMP, p < 0.001    31

 

Figure 6. Mean changes in perceived self-efficacy in making treatment decisions pre- and post CDSMP, p < 0.001............................................................................................................................... 32

 

Figure 7. Mean changes in perceived self-efficacy in taking medications pre- and post CDSMP, p < 0.001           33

 

Figure 8. Mean changes in perceived self-efficacy in managing pain pre- and post CDSMP, p < 0.001      34

 

Figure 9. Comparison of pre-and post-CDSMP time points for all seven areas................ 35

 

 

 

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