Associations between nocturia, race/ethnicity, and chronic disease conditions: a study from 2005-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys Público

Erni, Susanne (2017)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/ms35t957b?locale=es
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Abstract

Purpose: The aim is to identify independent associations of racial and ethnic groups and nocturia among a representative sample of non-Hispanic white (NHW), non-Hispanic black (NHB), and Mexican American (MA) U.S. adults, with the secondary aim of identifying and comparing the independent associations of chronic disease conditions, multimorbidity, and nocturia for each of the racial and ethnic groups.


Methods: The 2005-12 datasets of the U.S. National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) were used for this study. The dependent variable was the presence of nocturia defined as two or more voids per night. Nocturia was ascertained through the NHANES interview, which matches previously validated surveys. A multivariable logistic regression model stratified by sex and controlling for age category, education, medical insurance status, smoking status, chronic disease conditions, and adiposity was used to determine the association between race/ethnicity and nocturia. A multivariable model stratified by race/ethnicity and controlling for sex, age category, education, medical insurance status, smoking status, other chronic disease conditions, and adiposity was used to determine the association between chronic disease conditions and nocturia for each group.

Results: NHB and MA men were likely to have nocturia than NHW men in the multivariable model, OR=1.82, 95% CI 1.59, 2.08 and OR=1.75, 95% CI 1.49, 2.05, respectively. NHB and MA women were more likely to have nocturia than NHW women after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics and chronic disease conditions, OR=2.02, 95% CI 1.80, 2.26 and OR=1.34, 95% CI 1.17, 1.53, respectively. Arthritis, depression, and hypertension were the only three chronic disease conditions statistically significantly associated with nocturia for all NHW, NHB, and MA.


Conclusion: The study indicates nocturia is independently associated with race/ethnicity among U.S. adults. Among men and women, NHB and MA will more likely have nocturia compared to NHW. The study also demonstrated the variation across races in correlates of nocturia.

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION...............1
METHODS.......................2
RESULTS.........................6
DISCUSSION..................11
CONCLUSION.................15
REFERENCES..................16
TABLES.........................18
FIGURES........................29

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