Investigations of the Effect of HIV Status on Lead in the Body Público

Evans, Catherine Grace (2017)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/mg74qm961?locale=es
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Abstract

Blood lead levels in the United States are declining with time mostly due to the removal of lead from paint and gasoline. However, with no safe level of blood lead their resultant health effects still merit study, especially in vulnerable populations. HIV infection can alter many functions of the human body including how lead is processed in the body. New research shows that ART therapy can increase the rate at which bone (the primary lead storage place) is digested. This study parses out the benefits and complications of evaluating this potential interaction in NHANES data collected from 1999 to 2014. Weight adjusted t tests show that HIV positive participants have a higher blood lead level than HIV negative participants (1.5461, [95%CI 1.4455, 1.6540] and 1.2055 [95% CI 1.1996, 1.2114] respectively. A linear regression model with blood pressure (an associated health outcome for elevated blood lead levels) however shows no statistical significance and does not fit the data well in basic format or when controlling for age, race, age, ratio of family income to poverty, sex, CD4 count, and education level. Further research that accounts for duration of lead levels and time since HIV infection is needed to investigate if HIV is an effect modifier of the impact of lead on the body. This research is vital to adequately protecting vulnerable populations with chronic diseases that may need different response aid during a toxic release disaster such as the one in Flint, Michigan.

Table of Contents

Introduction and Background Information..........1

Methods........................................................4

Results..........................................................5

Discussion and Conclusions..............................6

References.....................................................8

Figures.........................................................10

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