Association of Objectively-Measured Physical Activity Patterns with Cardiovascular Risk Factors: a Pooled Analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-04 and 2005-06 Restricted; Files Only

Jianheng Li (Spring 2018)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/m326m1803?locale=en
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Abstract

 

BACKGROUND: The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans listed detailed physical activity (PA) recommendations for adults to reduce chronic disease risk especially cardiovascular disease (CVD), however, it failed to provide information on how the combination of PA intensity and frequency may affect cardiovascular fitness. Regular physical activity patterns may offer more CVD risk reduction versus longer, infrequent bursts (“weekend warrior”), but few studies have examined this.

 

PURPOSE: To investigate the associations of objectively measured PA patterns with CVD risk factors, both regarding total activity and the pattern of activity. The primary analysis involved, amongst active participants, comparing regular PA with less frequent bursts.

 

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional.

 

METHODS: Data pooled from the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, a total of 6,176 participants who were 30 years of age and older and wore accelerometers for at least ten hours per day on at least one day were included in the study. Five PA patterns (the inactive, insufficiently active, weekend warrior, regularly active and most regularly active) were constructed based on imputed PA intensity minutes and frequency. Weighted generalized linear regression and logistic regression were performed, controlling for potential confounders and imputing missing values.

 

RESULTS: The mean (SD) age was 51.7 (0.4) years, 46.9% were female, and 74.4% were white. Participants with the highest PA patterns had  65% (95% CI=0.25 to 0.50) less obesity, 49% (95% CI=0.37 to 0.70) less hypertension, 32% (95% CI=0.45 to 1.03) lower total cholesterol, and 59% (95% CI=0.19 to 0.86) less diabetes prevalence. Across higher levels of PA pattern, the  weekend warrior was associated with 9.8 mg/dl higher in total cholesterol (Ptrend=0.03) than the most regularly active participants, but otherwise no significant difference was found between activity pattern types in fully adjusted models.

CONCLUSION: There is an inverse association of PA patterns with CVD risk factors such that higher levels of PA patterns are associated with better cardiovascular health; more consistent PA may have a slightly better cholesterol profile compared to episodic PA (weekend warrior).

Table of Contents

 

1. INTRODUCTION...................................................................................................................1

 

2. METHODS……………………………………….....................……..………………..….................................3

 

2.1 Data and sample……….....……….....................………………………................................3

 

2.2 Measures of physical activity patterns.....................……….…................................3

 

2.3 Measures of dependent variables.....…….....................………................................4

 

2.4 Covariates….......................……….....................…………………..................................5

 

2.5 Statistical Analysis……..………………….....................………………................................5

 

3. RESULTS……………....................…………………….....................……………….................................7

 

4. DISCUSSION……..........………………………………….....................………………................................9

 

5. REFERENCE……......................……………………….....................……………..................................12

 

6. TABLES……………….....………………………………….....................……………….................................15

 

6.1 Table 1………………………….........…………….....................………..................................15

 

6.2 Table 2.…………………………………..........................................…………………….............16

 

6.3 Table 3............………………………..........................................…………………….............17

 

7. FIGURES……………………….............................................................………………………............18

 

7.1 Figure 1……………...........…………..........................................……………………............18

 

7.2 Figure 2…………………………………..........................................……………………............19

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