Trapped Inside: A Qualitative Study Assessing the Psychosocial Factors of Suicide in Jails 公开

Mbaba, Mary (2012)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/k3569522r?locale=zh
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Abstract


Abstract
Trapped Inside: A Qualitative Study Assessing the Psychosocial Factors of Suicide in Jails
Suicide is a pressing and multifaceted public health concern in the United States. Currently, it is the
tenth leading cause of death among adults in the U.S. population, and the number one cause of
death in U.S. jail institutions. The current suicide rate among inmates is 41 deaths per 100,000
detainees. The jail population is particularly vulnerable to the incidence of suicide. Psychological and
social factors include an inmate's past mental health history, an inmate's interpersonal relationships
with others, and the overall threatening jail environment in which suicide occurs.
The present study examined the psychosocial factors that precipitate the occurrence of suicide in
U.S. jails. A social ecological framework was utilized in conjugation with the social cognitive theory
of behavior to assess inmate suicide. Qualitative methods of data collection were employed in the
form of interviews and focus groups at a local Atlanta jail; participants included correctional mental
health professionals and jail chaplains. Also, mental health services and/or protocols that the jail has
implemented to protect against the occurrence suicide were examined.
Results of this study present psychosocial risk factors that predict suicide in a jail setting. Future
recommendations call for a structured multidisciplinary approach to holistically address the problem
of inmate suicide in the correctional setting. Additionally, a recommended need for increased
resources dedicated to successful community integration is suggested. Future public health research
calls for appropriate interventions that address the increased uptake of the mentally ill/disordered in
U.S. jail systems with use of socially- and culturally-informed techniques to accurately identify
inmates at high risk for suicide.

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS...1

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION...2
CHAPTER 2: BACKGROUND/LITERATURE REVIEW...5
CHAPTER 3: METHODS...29
CHAPTER 4: RESULTS...33
CHAPTER 5: DISCUSSION...51

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