Measuring the Impact of Participation in the Strong4Life Camp Program on the Quality of Life (QL) of Overweight and Obese Campers Using the PedsQL Test. Open Access

Abuznada, Salma (2016)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/jd472w66k?locale=en
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Abstract

Background: More than 14% of world's children and adolescents are either overweight or obese and 15% of children and adolescents are at risk of being overweight. Overweight and obesity negatively affect several different life quality factors including social, emotional, physical functioning and school performance. The Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQL) is a validated, and reliable instrument used to measure the quality of life among children and adolescents. It is a self-reflection of overall health and wellbeing. Residential camp programs have been used to support improvements in the weight status of children but little is know about their impact on other factors such as quality of life with or without weight improvement. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted to evaluate the impact of the Camp Strong4Life, a family centered, fun-filled, healthy behaviors camp program for overweight and obese children age 9-15 years, based in Georgia, USA. One of the camp goals is to improve the overall quality of life among campers, therefore, we measured the quality of life using the PedsQL before and after participation in the 2015 camp program. We also took into account other demographic factors that might influence quality of life, including race, gender, and household income. Results: A total sample of 95 boys and girls attended camp in May 2015 and a total of 55 returned in August 2015. The majority of our camp attendees were girls.. In baseline, the total mean PedsQL score was (77.81) and the standard deviation was (13.83). In Reunion Weekend, the total mean of the PedsQL was 81.53 (SD=13.77). Using t-tests, we found that the total score improved significantly between the Welcome Weekend(baseline) and the Reunion Weekend (3 month follow-up) (P-value=0.0007) The sub-scores also improved significantly. Discussion: Our study's findings were consistent with previous studies that found relationship between body weight, BMI and PedsQ. A major limitation is the small sample size that makes it harder to generalize out findings on larger scale. We would like to make more periodic follow up (semi-annually or annually) to see how effective is the camp in the long run.

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_________Salma Abuznada_________

Salma Abuznada

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Measuring the Impact of Participation in the Strong4Life Camp Program on the Quality of Life (QL) of Overweight and Obese Campers Using the PedsQL Test.

Salma Abuznada

Master of Public Health

Hubert Department of Global Health

_________________________________________

An abstract of a thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of in the Hubert Department of Global Health

Master of Public Health

Measuring the Impact of Participation in the Strong4Life Camp Program on the Quality of Life (QL) of Overweight and Obese Campers Using the PedsQL Test.

By Salma Abuznada

Chapter I: Introduction ............................................................5

Context of Project (Background) ............................................................5

Problem Statement ............................................................7

Significance of the problem ............................................................8

Purpose............................................................9

Chapter II: Literature Review ............................................................10

Pediatric Quality of Life ............................................................10

PedsQL Test Uses ............................................................11

Global Childhood Obesity ............................................................12

CDC definition of childhood overweight and obesity ............................................................12

Lifestyle and Physical Activity ............................................................13

Diet............................................................14

Home Environment ............................................................15

Childhood Obesity Complications ............................................................16

Obesity and School Performance ............................................................17

Childhood obesity prevention ............................................................18

Chapter III: Methodology............................................................20

Objective............................................................20

Methods............................................................20

Program design ............................................................20

Program population ............................................................21

Data collection ............................................................21

Camp Settings ............................................................22

Data Analysis ............................................................23

Data Quality ............................................................23

Ethical Considerations ............................................................23

Chapter IV: Results............................................................25

PedsQL............................................................25

PedsQL in relation to other variables............................................................26

Chapter V: Discussion ............................................................35

Chapter VI: Conclusion and Future Recommendations ............................................................37

Future recommendation ............................................................38

References............................................................39

APPENDICES............................................................45

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