Social Cognitive Performance and the Psychosis-Spectrum Prodrome Open Access

Goulding, Sandra Moore (2015)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/j3860765p?locale=en
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Abstract

Social cognitive (SC) impairment is pervasive in chronic and first-episode psychosis (FEP) samples, and an emerging body of research suggests individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis exhibit deficits intermediate to those found in healthy control (HC) and FEP groups. However, given the limited body of literature to date, it is unclear how SC deficits are linked with illness progression. This current investigation examines multiple SC domains (i.e., emotional processing/recognition, theory of mind, and relationship/social perception) in a sample large enough to compare SC performance between HC and CHR groups, examine the influence of sex on SC performance in the CHR group, and determine the relatedness of SC performance to clinical symptoms and functional status in CHR subjects at both baseline and 12-month follow-up. Results indicated SC deficits in the CHR group relative to the HC group. The influence of sex on SC performance was mixed depending on the SC domain measured. Similarly, at baseline, support for the relatedness of SC deficits and clinical symptoms/functioning varied as a function of the measure. Finally, there was no support for the predictive utility of baseline SC deficits for clinical symptoms and functioning at 12-month follow-up. Overall, this study contributes to efforts purposed to gain a more thorough understanding of the role of SC impairment in the psychosis-spectrum of disorders. Although prior investigations suggest the predictive utility of SC for detecting those at CHR for psychosis conversion, results from this study indicate that SC is likely best understood as a clinical outcome domain that prompts help-seeking behaviors in individuals who present at CHR clinics.

Table of Contents

Introduction.....................................................................1

Method..........................................................................21

Results..........................................................................28

Discussion......................................................................30

Tables and Figures...........................................................42

References.....................................................................51

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