Culture of honor, psychopathy, and aggression: An examination of how regional differences and personality traits relate to aggression 公开

Jones, Meredith (2011)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/h128nd824?locale=zh
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Abstract

Abstract
Culture of honor, psychopathy, and aggression: An examination of how regional differences and personality traits relate to aggression
By Meredith K. Jones

The relationships between psychopathy and aggression as well as culture of honor (COH) and aggression are well-established. Nevertheless, it is unknown how, if at all, psychopathy and COH combine or interact to influence risk for aggression. The present study investigated whether an interaction between psychopathy and COH would account for more variance in aggressive behavior than either psychopathy or COH alone. A total of 144 Emory undergraduates participated in the study. 63 participants completed selfreport measures of psychopathy, COH, aggression, executive functioning, and alcohol consumption. An additional 81 participants were administered an insult manipulation directed towards measuring laboratory aggression, and also completed all self-report measures. COH was measured in several ways, via region (North versus South), city size, and endorsement of self-report measures. Aggression was also measured in several ways, via laboratory measures, cognitive biases toward aggression, and self-reports of physical and relational aggression. Findings suggested that COH did not moderate the relationship between psychopathy and aggression. Relationships between psychopathy and relational aggression and COH and relational aggression were observed. The findings suggested that there may be limits to the relationship between COH and aggression, and that future research should be directed towards a clearer definition of the COH construct.

Culture of honor, psychopathy, and aggression: An examination of how regional differences and personality traits relate to aggression
By
Meredith K. Jones
A.B., Dartmouth College, 2005
M.A., Emory University, 2007
Advisor: Scott Lilienfeld, Ph.D.
A dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the
James T. Laney School of Graduate Studies of Emory University
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy
in Clinical Psychology
2010

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Introduction...1
Method...24
Results...34
Discussion...53
References...71
Table 1...85
Table 2...86
Table 3...87
Table 4...88
Table 5...89
Table 6...90
Table 7...91
Table 8...92
Table 9...93
Table 10...96
Table 11...98
Table 12...101
Table 13...103
Table 14...105
Table 15...108
Table 16...111
Table 17...114
Table 18...117
Table 19...119
Table 20...121
Table 21...123
Figure captions...125
Figure 1...126
Figure 2...127
Figure 3...128
Figure 4...129
Figure 5...130
Figure 6...131
Figure 7...132
Figure 8...133
Appendix A...134
Appendix B...135
Appendix C...136
Appendix D...137
Appendix E...139
Appendix F...141
Appendix G...142
Appendix H...143
Appendix I...144
Appendix J...145
Appendix K...146
Appendix L...149
Appendix M...150
Appendix N...151
Appendix O...153

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