Globalization, Nation-State, and International Organizations 公开

Li, Xue (2015)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/gh93h0373?locale=zh
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Abstract

In the globalization era, domestic institutions have been increasingly shaped by transnational forces, including international organizations (IOs) and transnational flows of trade and investment. This dissertation advances a sociology of globalization by examining 1) sources of International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) (Chapter 2); 2) the association between world society and the global rise of the nation-state (Chapters 3 and 4); and 3) how state size is shaped by the interplay of economic globalization and the development of INGOs (Chapter 5). INGOs data are from the Yearbooks of International Organizations 1953-2003, which provide the most complete data on INGOs worldwide. The data on the rise of the nation-state contains information on 145 territories from 1816 until a nation-state was created. By 2001, 139 of these territories had made the transition to the nation-state. As for the size of state, data are drawn from six cases in East Asia (South Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand and Taiwan) from 1971 to 2009. Several statistical techniques are employed, including 1) discrete-time event history analysis, estimated via a logistic regression analysis of territory years with natural cubic splines to conceptualize time effects and 2) Error Correction Model to correct biased estimates due to the violation of routine regression assumption in Time-Series-Cross-Sectional data analysis. Analyses using these techniques show that 1) most INGOs remain headquartered in core countries, which may impose significant costs on INGO hosts; 2) global diffusion processes complement the more local processes stressed by historical institutionalism to encourage nation-state creation after WWII; and 3) in East Asian cases, the downsizing effect generated by economic globalization on state size can be moderated by the rise of INGOs which impose an upsizing effect. Thus, the globalization processes have a self-limiting characteristic which limits the size of negative effects. The key contributions of this dissertation include 1) revealing the dynamics of the rise of the nation-state during the post WWII period; and 2) finding the interdependent effects within globalization processes, which mediate the consequences of each aspect of globalization, and thus should be taken into account when investigating globalization effects.


Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction. 1

BACKGROUND.. 1

EXISTING RESEARCH.. 5

DISCUSSION.. 8

Chapter 2 Bring the Organization Back In: INGO Inequality in World Polity. 10

BACKGROUND.. 10

DATA AND METHODS. 13

RESULTS. 14

DISCUSSION.. 21

Chapter 3 World Polity Matters: Another Look at the Rise of the Nation-State across the World, 1816-2001 31

THEORETICAL ISSUES. 33

RESULTS. 36

CONCLUSIONS. 40

Chapter 4 World Polity was Emerging: the Rise of the Nation-State across the World, 1919-1945. 47

INTRODUCTION.. 47

BACKGROUND.. 48

DATA AND METHODS. 52

RESULTS. 54

CONCLUSION.. 61

Chapter 5 Globalization and State Size: Interdependent Impacts of Global Civil Society and Economic Globalization 76

INTRODUCTION.. 76

ECONOMIC GLOBALIZATION AND STATE SIZE.. 80

GLOBAL CIVIL SOCIETY AND STATE SIZE.. 84

DATA AND METHODS. 91

FINDINGS. 97

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION.. 102

Chapter 6 Conclusion. 111

LOOKING BACK.. 111

OVERALL CONCLUSIONS. 113

References. 116

Appendix. 128

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