Smoking behaviors, implementation of smoke-free policy and determinants among hotel and restaurant employees in Hangzhou, China Open Access

Duan, Zongshuan (2014)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/gb19f588x?locale=en
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Abstract

Objective To investigate smoking prevalence, implementation of smoke-free policy and corresponding determinants among employees from thirty hotels and restaurants in Hangzhou, China

Methods Data were collected from baseline and post-intervention surveys from employees from thirty hotels and restaurants in Hangzhou (n=2768) by convenience sampling, through the Emory University Global Health Institute China Tobacco Control Partnership (GHI-CTP) Tobacco-Free Cities (TFC) program conducted by the Hangzhou TFC office at Hangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We used principal component analysis to group influencing variables including employees' knowledge and attitudes towards tobacco use and smoke-free policies, and performed multivariate logistic regression models to measure the associations between employees' tobacco use related behaviors, including smoking status and implementation of smoke-free policy in their workplaces, and influencing factors.

Results Of the 2768 sampled hotels and restaurants employees in Hangzhou, the current smoking prevalence of male employees was 42.0%, compared with that of female employees as 1.47%. Among all employees who reported seeing smoking behaviors in the last 7 days at their workplaces, 76.8% tried to discourage the smokers at their workplaces. After adjusting for age groups, gender, education, marital status and peer effect, factors significantly associated with current smoking status included attitudes towards smoking in public areas [OR=0.27, 95% CI (0.21, 0.35)], smoking in hotel business areas [OR=3.5, 95% CI (2.4, 5.2)], smoking in hotel nonbusiness areas [OR=2.3, 95% CI (1.7, 3.3)], smoking outside hotels [OR=1.7, 95% CI (1.3, 2.1)], smoking in restaurant business areas [OR=4.2, 95% CI (2.8, 6.3)], smoking in restaurant nonbusiness areas [OR=3.2, 95% CI (2.2, 4.6)], smoking outside restaurants [OR=2.0, 95% CI (1.6, 2.6)]; factors that were significantly associated with behavior of discouraging smokers in workplace included the knowledge factors as smoking causing serious illness [OR=1.8, 95% CI (1.0, 3.3)], secondhand smoke causes serious illness [OR=1.8, 95% CI (1.1, 3.0)], and common knowledge [OR=1.5, 95% CI (1.1, 2.2)] including smoking may cause stroke, heart attack, emphysema, male impotence, and secondhand smoking may cause heart attack in adults.

Conclusion Employees' attitudes towards tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke in public places and workplaces were significantly associated with their current smoking status, while their knowledge of serious illness caused by smoking and secondhand smoke exposure was significantly associated with their behaviors to discourage others from smoking at their workplaces.

Table of Contents

Table 1: Background information of hotel and restaurant employees before and after TFC the intervention, Hangzhou (n=2768) (Page 28)

Table 2: Comparison of knowledge of harms of smoking and secondhand smoking among hotels and restaurants employees before and after the TFC intervention (n=2768) (Page 31)

Table 3: Comparison of attitudes towards tobacco use and smoke-free policy in public places, hotels and restaurants before and after the TFC intervention (n=2768) (Page 33)

Table 4: Difference of factor values of hotel and restaurant employees' knowledge and attitude towards smoking between groups with different smoking status (Page 35)

Table 5: Difference of factor values of hotel and restaurant employees' knowledge and attitude towards smoking between groups with different behaviors to discourage others smoking (Page 35)

Table 6: Crude and adjusted associations between hotel and restaurant employees' knowledge and attitude towards smoking and their current smoking status (n=2368) (Page 38)

Table 7: Crude and adjusted relationships between respondents' knowledge and attitude towards smoking and their behaviors to discourage others smoking (n=932) (Page 39)

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