Factors Predicting Failure in an Intervention Program to Prevent Malnutrition among Children in Malawi Open Access

McCray, Alison Michele (2011)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/dv13zv01x?locale=en
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Abstract


Background
Moderate acute malnutrition affects 10% of children worldwide resulting in lifelong adverse effects
including increased mortality, suppressed immune system function, and delayed growth and
cognitive development. Malawi is a highly food insecure nation where many children experience
multiple episodes of malnutrition. Little information exists regarding predictors of failure among
children treated with supplementary therapeutic feeding; this study wil establish a relevant literature
base.
Methods
Approximately 2700 children diagnosed with moderate acute malnutrition were enrolled in the study
and treated with supplementary food. Data were col ected at time of enrol ment, at 3, 6, and 12
months post-enrollment, and for any episode of malnutrition during follow up. Data collection
included anthropometric measurements (length, weight, mid-upper arm circumference) demographic
information, and a food insecurity survey. Logistic regression was performed to assess for predictors
of therapeutic feeding treatment failure. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of
repeated failures. Linear regression was performed to identify predictors of weight gain over the
total time followed, approximately 12 months.
Results
Female sex, younger age, and greater malnutrition at enrol ment predicted failure to prevent
malnutrition in an intervention program to prevent malnutrition. Notably, the food insecurity scale
used was not a predictor of malnutrition. Weight-for-height Z-score (WHZ), female gender,
younger age, and total time followed were predictors for total weight gained during time followed
for the study.
Conclusions
Therapeutic feeding programs should be aware of factors predicting multiple episodes of
malnutrition, ie. females, younger children, and those with more severe malnutrition at time of
enrollment.

Table of Contents

Table of contents

Introduction…………………………………………...………………………..............……Page 1

Methods………………………………………………...……………………………………Page 5

Results……………………………………………..…………………………………...……Page 8

Discussion……………………………………………..………………………….……..…Page 11

Conclusion and Recommendations…………………………………….……………..……Page 13

References………………………………………………………..……………..…….……Page 14

Tables and Figures…………………………………………...………………...…………..Page 16

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