2 Relation between tooth loss and tobacco usage: Findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Open Access

Shah, Nirmal Mahesh (2010)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/dn39x182m?locale=en
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Abstract

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Relation between tooth loss and tobacco usage:
Findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
System.
Nirmal Shah B.D.S., Pamela Mink M.P.H, PhD


ABSTRACT
Background

Smoking cigarettes is associated with increased tooth loss; however research
establishing an association between the number of teeth removed and cigarette
smoking status as well as smokeless tobacco use status is limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the
association between the number of teeth lost and tobacco use (cigarette smoking status
and smokeless tobacco use status) in the US adult population.
Methods
We used data from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to
examine the association between self-reported tobacco use (cigarette smoking status
and smokeless tobacco use status) and number of teeth removed. We estimated the prevalence estimates for
each of the selected covariates by the number teeth removed as well as tobacco use
,and also evaluated the odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals by using multivariate logistic regression
model.

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Results
In this US adult sample, 31.5% reported removing 1-5 teeth and 11% reported
removing 6 or more (but not all) teeth. Respondents who reported "currently"
smoking cigarettes had a significantly higher prevalence of 6 or more (but not all) teeth
removed when compared to respondents who reported "never" smoking cigarettes
(16% vs. 7% "current" and "never" smokers respectively). In a multivariate
logistic regression model adjusting for selected covariates, respondents who reported
"currently" smoking cigarettes were 3.5 times as likely to have 6 or more (but not
all) teeth removed than respondents who reported "never" smoking cigarettes.
Respondents who reported being "former" cigarette smokers were 2.2 times as
likely to have 6 or more (but not all) teeth removed than respondents who reported
"never" smoking cigarettes. The odds of having lost 6 or more (but not all) teeth
among "current" smokeless tobacco users were similar to those who reported "never"
using smokeless tobacco (OR= 1.1, 95% CI= 1.1 to 1.2).
Conclusion
A strong association was observed between cigarette smoking and number of teeth
removed due to infection. Multidisciplinary efforts are needed to raise awareness of
the effects of tobacco on tooth loss. Regular dental examinations with periodic dental
scaling are important for preventing tooth loss.


Table of Contents

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Introduction........................................................................................................1
2. Methods..............................................................................................................3
3. Results...............................................................................................................11
4. Discussion.........................................................................................................14
5. References.........................................................................................................18
6. Tables................................................................................................................21
7. Bibliography......................................................................................................32






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