Factors associated with physical condition of insecticide treated bed nets in Senegal Open Access

Cason, Emily Barbara (2014)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/d217qq245?locale=en
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Abstract

Background: Insecticide treated nets (ITNs) are widely used to prevent malaria transmission. Net integrity decreases over time with use, and nets with holes are less effective at preventing malaria transmission. There is a need to better understand what factors contribute to the deterioration of nets so that strategies can be implemented to prevent a loss in protection from malaria.

Methods: A dataset collected by a Peace Corps Volunteer in Senegal during activities to promote net care and repair was used to examine the associations between several ITN care and use practices and five measures of ITN integrity. Multivariate linear and logistic models were constructed and estimates for the associations between the care and use factors and the ITN integrity outcomes were obtained.

Results: In three of the five models, prior repairs to the net were significantly associated with worse ITN integrity. Greater numbers of children under the age of five and greater numbers of children between the ages of 6 and 14 sleeping under the net were both associated with increased odds of having at least one hole in the net. Frequency of net washing was not significantly associated with net integrity in any of the final models.

Conclusions: The strong associations between prior repairs to the net and poor ITN condition may be indicative of a potential lack of proper net repair practices. ITN repair should be encouraged in order to maintain net effectiveness for as long as possible. Some factors that were expected to be strongly associated with ITN integrity outcomes were not significantly associated in this study. Further research is needed to better understand the ways in which net integrity can be maintained.

Table of Contents

Introduction………………………………………………………………………………..1
Background………………………………………………………………………………..3
Methods…………………………………………………………………………………....5
Data Source………………………………………………………………………..5
Hypothesis…………………………………………………………………………5
Variable Specification……………………………………………………………..5
Statistical Analysis………………………………………………………………...7
Results……………………………………………………………………………………..9
ITN integrity and use………………………….…………………………………..9
Model 1……………………………………………………………………………9
Model 2…………………………………………………………………………..10
Model 3…………………………………………………………………………..12
Model 4…………………………………………………………………………..13
Model 5…………………………………………………………………………..14
Discussion………………………………………………………………………………..16
Limitations and Strengths………………………………………………………………..20
Future Directions………………………………………………………………………...22
References………………………………………………………………………………..23
Tables…………………………………………………………………………………….28
Table 1…………………………………………………………………………...28
Table 2…………………………………………………………………………...29
Table 3…………………………………………………………………………...30

Table 4…………………………………………………………………………...31
Table 5…………………………………………………………………………...32
Table 6…………………………………………………………………………...33
Table 7…………………………………………………………………………...34
Table 8…………………………………………………………………………...35
Table 9…………………………………………………………………………...36
Table 10………………………………………………………………………….37
Table 11………………………………………………………………………….38
Figures……………………………………………………………………………………39
Figure 1…………………………………………………………………………..39

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