Becoming British: The Transformation of Scottish National Identity in the Long Eighteenth Century Open Access

Hutson, Amanda (2013)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/c534fp09f?locale=en
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Abstract

This paper explores the nature of Scottish national identity during the period scholars have termed the "long eighteenth century" (1688-1830), a period that witnessed both the rise and fall of Jacobitism and the emergence of the British state. Within this analysis, it also seeks to explain the Scottish presence in the paradox of British national identity. By utilizing Anthony Smith's theory of ethno-symbolism, a socio-cultural approach to the study of nations and nationalism, this paper aims to illustrate the conceptualization of the Scottish and British nations based on a selection of key symbolic ideas and traditions. Throughout the paper, contemporary Scottish folksongs are used to reveal the symbolic manipulation of Scottish myths, memories, traditions, and values that were adapted to strengthen the cultural appeal of each nation. The first half of the paper explores symbols and traditions cultivated by the Stuart dynasty in order to unify the Scottish people under one articulation of national identity. The second half traces those same symbols through their use in a British framework and demonstrates their re-imagination as essential factors of British national identity. An analysis of these songs and the broader cultural, social, political, and economic trends they reflect suggest that the tension between Scottish and British identities was not as powerful as previously supposed and did not inhibit a compatible sense of dual identity.

Table of Contents

Introduction...............................................................1

Section 1: Historiography and Methodology......................6

Section 2: Active Song and the Scottish Nation..............20

Section 3: Romantic Song and the British Nation..............42

Conclusion................................................................76 Bibliography..............................................................82

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