A high-resolution metabolomics analysis of the association between perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), body composition and related metabolic outcomes in an Atlanta cohort translation missing: es.hyrax.visibility.files_restricted.text

Krasnodemski, Katherine M. (Spring 2019)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/9c67wn797?locale=es
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Abstract

Objective: To determine the association between plasma levels of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), measured by high resolution metabolomics, body composition and related metabolic outcomes at the baseline visit in the Emory-Georgia Tech Predictive Health Institute’s Center for Health Discovery and Well Being (CHDWB) cohort.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study on 179 adults who were enrolled in the CHDWB cohort who had baseline plasma high-resolution metabolomics data available.  Multiple linear regression models were used to assess the association between plasma PFASs, body composition, and related metabolic outcomes.

Results: Males had significantly higher PFAS intensities compared to women.  Age, race, income, and education were not significantly associated with PFAS intensity. Visceral adipose tissue mass was positively associated with plasma PFASs, but the relationship was no longer statistically significant after adjusting for sex.  No significant associations were present between intensities of PFASs and other cardiometabolic outcomes (insulin resistance, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, cholesterol [total, HDL, and LDL], measures of oxidative stress, or proinflammatory cytokines).

Discussion: In this study, we found no significant associations between PFAS intensity, body composition, and related metabolic outcomes.  Larger, longitudinal studies should be conducted in order to determine the true relationship between PFAS exposure, body composition, and related metabolic outcomes.

Table of Contents

Introduction...........................1

Methods.................................5

Results...................................8

Discussion.............................10

Funding Support....................12

Figures and Tables.................13 

References............................17

Supplementary Information...23

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