Seasonal Influence of Nutrient Dynamics and Conspecific Interference on Culex quinquefasciatus Oviposition and Environmental Parameters of Combined Sewage Overflow (CSO) Habitats
 
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Nguyen, An (2011)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/8c97kr01p?locale=en
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Abstract

A study of factors that influence mosquito oviposition and aquatic ecology in Tanyard Creek, an urban stream in Atlanta, GA that receives combined storm and waste water discharge, was conducted in 2008 and 2009. The effects of combined sewage overflows (CSOs) on Culex
quinquefasciatus activity were determined by directly manipulating nutrient density in CSO habitats. Nutrient enrichment of the aquatic habitats was positively correlated with oviposition. Secondly, availability of oviposition habitats to conspecific (members of the same species) use was controlled to study the effects of conspecific presence on Culex oviposition. Conspecific presence was an important deterrent to oviposition in June. There may not have been enough oviposition activity in the fall and spring to accurately quantify conspecific effects. Next,
nutrient dynamics in isolated pools (container habitats) and free-flowing body (CSO stream) were compared. Ammonia and nitrate, known to be oviposition attractants, accumulated in higher quantities in isolated pools relative to the stream. Flushing of the stream following precipitation events expectedly washed out nutrient densities. Lastly, weather was assessed throughout the study to quantify the effects of temperature and precipitation on oviposition. Temperature and time of year were clear and consistent predictors of egg raft abundance for all treatments in this experiment. It is unclear whether rainfall was important by itself, but in combination with other factors, the interaction with precipitation was significant. Culex quinquefasciatus is the main vector for West Nile Virus in the southeastern United States, and thus understanding mosquito dynamics can lead to better understanding of urban WNV transmission.

Table of Contents

Introduction………………………………………………………………………..………1
Methods……………………………………………………………………………..……..7
Results……………………………………………………………………………….….....11
Discussion…………………………………………………………………………..……..14
References………………………………………………………………………..………..21
Appendix…………………………………………………………………………………..23

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