Identification of Significant Metabolites Associated with Multi-drug Resistant Tuberculosis through Metabolome-wide Association Study Público

Zhang, Lifan (2015)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/6m311p89m?locale=es
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Abstract

Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that still causes a huge disease burden worldwide, and the treatment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is particularly difficult. The object of thesis is to show that tuberculosis drug susceptibility can be identified using metabolome-wide association study techniques. We collected plasma samples from drug-sensitive and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients in Georgia, and performed high throughput mass spectrometry to identify possible metabolites. We then built statistical models to identify metabolites significantly correlated with drug susceptibility. In addition, we highlighted the different behaviors of those significant metabolites by visualizing them on heatmaps. Some possible pathways identified through the significant metabolites are also presented.

Table of Contents

Chapter I Introduction
1.1 Tuberculosis
1.2 Metabolomics
Chapter II Material and Methods
2.1 Data Collection
2.2 Statistical Analysis
2.2.1 Identifying significant metabolites with cross-sectional analysis
2.2.2 Identifying significant metabolites using differences between metabolite concentrations
Chapter III Results and Discussion
3.1 Metabolites Identified
3.2 Metabolite Annotation and Pathway Analysis
3.3 Constraints and future directions
Chapter IV Conclusion

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