Associations of Child Aggression and Intimate Partner Violence with Social Development among Low SES, African- American Childrenii Associations of Child Aggression and Intimate Partner Violence with Social Development among Low SES, African-American Children Open Access

Rediger, Kaitlyn Noele (2012)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/6969z148w?locale=en
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Abstract

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Associations of Child Aggression and Intimate Partner Violence
with Social Development among Low SES, African-American
Children
Bachelor of Science
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
2008
Thesis Committee Chair: Nancy Thompson, MPH, PHD
An abstract of
A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the
Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of
Master of Public Health
in Behavioral Sciences and Health Education
2012

v
Abstract
Violence is a major public health concern because it has a tremendous impact on the
health and well-being of today's youth (CDC, 2010). Unfortunately, injuries and deaths
resulting from youth violence comprise only part of a larger public health dilemma. On a more
broad-based scale, violence can also affect the health of communities by increasing health care
costs, decreasing property values, disrupting social services, and decreasing social capital (Ernst
et al., 2008). Previous literature confirms the negative consequences that result for children who
are physically and sexually abused. However, there is far less literature pertaining to the impact
of directly witnessing domestic abuse, both verbal and physical, on children's social
development and a gap in the literature on the impact of indirectly witnessing verbal and/or
physical violence on the social development of children in vulnerable populations such as low-
income, African American children.
This study investigated the effects of directly and indirectly witnessing violence
(representing their social norm) on children's relationship functioning, specifically examining
children's aggressive behavior among low-income African American children 8-12 years of age.
In addition, the study included multiple informants (both mother and child report data).
Understanding the effects of directly and indirectly witnessing violence on childhood
development and the social problems associated with the exposure is an important foundation for
the design of future programs to treat these children.
The findings that emerged from this study suggest that exposure to IPV (directly
or indirectly) plays an integral role in predicting youth aggression in low-income African
American youth. This indicates the need for greater emphasis on preventative, theory-driven,
educational programs for children from violent homes.

Table of Contents

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Table of Contents

Introduction and Rationale






1

Theoretical Framework







4

Literature Review








7

Methodology








22

Data Analysis and Findings






29

Conclusions, Implications, and Recommendations



33

References and Appendixes






38

List of Figures and Tables

Figure.1 Theory of Reasoned Action & Theory of Planned Behavior




Table.1 Results from Hierarchical Linear Regression Test







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