Association between in utero perfluoroalkyl substance exposure and anti-Müllerian hormone levels in adolescent females translation missing: es.hyrax.visibility.files_restricted.text

Donley, Grayson (2017)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/6682x470w?locale=es
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Abstract

Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are synthetic, ubiquitous chemicals that can cross the placental barrier and impact reproductive health. Lower levels of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), a serum marker of ovarian reserve, are associated with reduced fertility. Some evidence indicates that in utero environmental exposures could influence reproduction in female offspring through changes in ovarian development and function. We investigated the association between in utero PFAS exposure and AMH levels in female adolescents using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a British pregnancy cohort. Maternal serum samples were collected during pregnancy and analyzed for concentrations of four commonly found PFAS, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), and perfluorononanoate (PFNA). AMH levels were measured in serum of female offspring (mean age, 15.4 years). We used a sample of 446 mother-daughter dyads for multivariable linear regression analyses, controlling for maternal age at delivery, pre-pregnancy body-mass index, and maternal education. Multiple imputation was utilized to impute missing values of AMH (61.2%) and covariates. Mean PFAS concentrations (ng/mL (SD)) were: PFOS 21.32 (10.13), PFOA 4.02 (1.86), PFHxS 2.43 (4.93), PFNA 0.56 (0.28). AMH levels were log-transformed for analyses. The geometric mean AMH concentration was 3.88 ng/mL (IQR: 2.67, 6.37). After controlling for confounders, mean differences in AMH per one ng/mL increases in PFOA, PFOS, PFHxS, and PFNA were 2.9% (95% CI: -2.3%, 8.2%, p=0.25), 0.5% (95%CI: -0.4%, 1.5%, p=0.24 ), 0.9% (95% CI: -0.5%, 2.3%, p=0.21), and 8.0% (-76.9%, 92.9%, p=0.82) respectively. These findings suggest that there is no association between in utero PFAS exposure and AMH levels in female adolescents.

Table of Contents

Introduction............................................1

Methods.................................................4

Results...................................................7

Discussion...............................................8

References............................................10

Tables...................................................14

Appendix...............................................18

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