On Behalf of Another: Exploring Social Value Orientation and Responses to Injustice Open Access

Brody, Leslie Michelle (2010)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/6682x408d?locale=en
Published

Abstract

Abstract
On Behalf of Another: Exploring Social Value Orientation and Responses to Injustice
By Leslie Brody

This study examined the relationship between a person's "social value orientation" and involvement in activities aimed at reducing social injustice on behalf of others. Social value orientation is an individual level factor that impacts preference for certain outcomes. The literature on social value orientation suggests that, when faced with social dilemmas (i.e. situations where individuals must choose to pursue their own, immediate self-interests or to sacrifice for the good of a larger group), some people respond in a cooperative, or "pro-social" manner, while others respond individualistically or competitively in a "pro-self" manner. The goals of this project were twofold: to explore the social antecedents of social value orientation; and to examine whether social value orientation and other individuals level factors (i.e. demographics, childhood socialization, personal beliefs and values) influence the manner in which people respond to injustice that is observed but not personally experienced. In order to better understand what factors shape responses to injustice, this study drew from literature in the areas of psychology, social psychology, social movements, political activism, and Jewish studies.

Participants in this study were American Jewish adults, a population chosen because of the noted salience of social justice issues in Jewish communities. A survey research method was used to assess individual social value orientation and social antecedents. Participants were also asked to read and respond to vignettes describing two different, socially unjust scenarios. Regression was used to analyze data. Results of this study indicate that social value orientation and several other variables affect not only anticipated responses to injustice, but also the type of response preferred by observers of injustice. Factors that had the most influence over anticipated behavioral responses to injustice included social value orientation, education, income, valuing community involvement, and believing that a behavioral response would make a difference.

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTERS
1. Introduction...1
2. Jewish Responses to Social Injustice...11
3. Justice Processes...20
4. Social Value Orientation...48
5. Methods...92
6. Results...110
7. Conclusion...134
8. Appendix A: IRB Waiver and Survey...152
9. Appendix B: Alternative Social Value Orientation Measures...165
10. Appendix C: Hypotheses and Summary of Results...167
11. Appendix D: Summary of Means and Standard Deviations for Response Strategies...174
12. Appendix E: Reliability Values for Scales...175
13. Works Cited...176


FIGURES AND TABLES
Figure 1 Justice Processes Model...6, 135
Table 1 Logistical Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of Social Antecedents on SVO...114
Table 2 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of SVO on Perceptions of Justice...117
Table 3 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of Perceptions of Injustice on Use of Reflexive or Active Strategies in Response to Observed Social Injustice...117
Table 4 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of Perceptions of Injustice and Personal Values, Beliefs, and Experiences on Use of Reflexive or Active Strategies in Response to Observed Social Injustice...118
Table 5 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of SVO on Use of Reflexive or Active Strategies in Response to Observed Social Injustice...119
Table 6 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of SVO and Demographics on Use of Reflexive or Active Strategies in Response to Observed Social Injustice...120
Table 7 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of Perceptions of Injustice, SVO, and Demographics on Use of Reflexive or Active Strategies in Response to Observed Social Injustice...121
Table 8 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of Perceptions of Injustice, SVO, and Childhood Socialization on Use of Reflexive or Active Strategies in Response to Observed Social Injustice...125
Table 9 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of Perceptions of Injustice, SVO, and Personal Beliefs, Values, and Experiences on Use of Reflexive or Active Strategies in Response to Observed Social Injustice...127
Table 10 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of SVO and Personal Values, Beliefs, and Experiences on Use of Reflexive or Active Strategies in Response to Observed Social Injustice...129
Table 11 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of Empathy on Perceptions of Justice...130
Table 12 Regression Coefficients and Standard Errors for Analyses of the Effect of Belief in Change on Perceptions of Justice...131

About this Dissertation

Rights statement
  • Permission granted by the author to include this thesis or dissertation in this repository. All rights reserved by the author. Please contact the author for information regarding the reproduction and use of this thesis or dissertation.
School
Department
Degree
Submission
Language
  • English
Research field
Keyword
Committee Chair / Thesis Advisor
Committee Members
Last modified

Primary PDF

Supplemental Files