Parental perception of neighborhood safety and children's physical activity Open Access

Zytnick, Deena S. (2012)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/5m60qs02z?locale=en
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Abstract

Abstract
Parental perception of neighborhood safety and children's physical activity
Objective: This research examines the relationship between parental perception of
neighborhood safety and children's physical activity among 5th grade children, and factors
associated with physical activity behavior based on the ecological model. The specific
outcome variables explored were the number of days per week children engaged in vigorous
physical activity and children's regular use of recreational facilities for physical activity.
Methods: Data from the parents of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Kindergarten
(ECLS-K) cohort 5th grade sample (N=9,725) were analyzed. Linear regression was used to
examine the association between parental perception of neighborhood safety and mean days
per week children engaged in vigorous physical and also the association between regular use
of at least one recreational facility for physical activity and the number of days per week
children engaged in vigorous physical activity. Logistic regression was used to examine the
association between parental perception of neighborhood safety and regular use of at least
one recreational facility for physical activity.
Results: Overall, 5th graders engaged in vigorous physical activity an average of 3.73 days per
week. Parental perception of neighborhood safety was associated with the number of days
per week children engaged in vigorous physical activity. The majority of 5th graders (81.6%)
regularly used recreational facilities for physical activity. However, parental perception of
neighborhood safety was not associated with children's regular use of recreational facilities
for physical activity. Regular use of at least one recreational facility for physical activity was
associated with the number of days per week children engaged in vigorous physical activity.
Conclusion: It is important to consider parental perception of neighborhood safety when
designing interventions to increase physical activity. Further research is needed to see how
changes at the physical environment and policy levels affect parental perception of
neighborhood safety.




Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1
Chapter 2: Literature Review -- 10
Chapter 3: Methods -- 23
Chapter 4: Results -- 31
Chapter 5: Discussion -- 37
References -- 49
Tables -- 57

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