Nothing Else to Wear: Jordanian Bedouin Under the British Mandate and Hashemite State Open Access

Endelman, Jonathan Charles (2010)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/3n203z62x?locale=en
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Abstract

Abstract
Nothing Else to Wear: Jordanian Bedouin under the British Mandate and Hashemite State
By Jonathan Endelman

The concept of nationalism and the nation-state, although late arrivals in the Middle East, represent the most successful exports in Western history. Nationalism often operates by embracing certain groups, while excluding others. Jordanian national identity, for example, has systematically marginalized the Bedouin through a process of state penetration into tribal life that caused critical economic, political, legal, and cultural changes. The decline of the Bedouin in public life can be traced to the British mandate from 1920 to 1946 and its effects. Later Jordanian governments adopted similar restrictive policies, while utilizing aspects of Bedouin cultural such as dress, food and music for state use. British land reform and efforts to discourage nomadic pastoralism hampered Bedouin economic activity. Despite these changes, social groupings and customs remain central to the Bedouin. The comparative lack of state interference in the social arena has allowed this aspect of Bedouin identity to continue even today. Although attention has been focused on the "Jordanian/Palestinian" split in Jordan, the decline of the tribal Bedouin at the hands of the state has merited less scrutiny because they do not fit within the confines of the state system. The process of de-socialization by which the state produces citizens especially hurts the Bedouin because they rely on social relations as the basis for their societal self-understanding.

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………. 1
CHAPTER 1: MAKING A NATION ………………………………………………. 3
CHAPTER 2: DE-SOCIALIZATION AND IDENTITY………………………...20
CHAPTER 3: THE BRITISH AND THE NEW SYSTEM……………. …………29
CHAPTER 4: RETAINING ELEMENTS OF THE OLD……………………….. 50
CHAPTER 5: WHERE THE NEW ORDER FELL SHORT…………………….. 60
CHAPTER 6: THE COLONIAL CONSTRUCTION OF REALITY…………… 75
CHAPTER 7: WHY IT FAILED…………………………………………..……… 97
CHAPTER 8: THE NEW JORDANIAN NATIONAL IDENTITY ........ 111
CONCLUSION…………………………………………………………………... 127
BIBLIOGRAPHY…………………………………………………………………146

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