Barriers to effective IPV homicide prevention. Georgia 2014 Open Access

Garcia Ruiz, Monica (2017)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/2n49t234d?locale=en
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Abstract

Background: Georgia is one of the ten states with highest mortality rates for intimate partner homicides (IPH). From 2010 to 2014 there were 226 IPH, leaving a tremendous impact over the survivals and their communities. Due to the characteristics of IPV, this kind of homicides are preventable. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of IPH in Georgia during 2014. Methods: Female homicides data from 2014 was analysed using the Georgia Violent Death Reporting System. Characteristics of this events were examined using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results: Over the 54 cases that we analyzed, more than half of the victims (52%) were Black/African American, and 43% White. The femicides perpetrated by intimate partner differed significantly from the femicides perpetrated by other individual (IPH=73% vs. other 16%, p=0.0001). During 2014, women in Georgia had 14 times higher probability of being killed by intimate partner than the odds of being killed by other perpetrator (OR 14.45: 95% CI 8.36, 24.98). Conclusion: The characteristics of IPH share important similarities with other studies in regard of characteristics such as perpetrator's alcohol or drug consumption, gun access, women's intention to leave the relation, and home occurrence. However, women murdered by intimate partners in Georgia showed differences compared to what was pointed out by the literature in terms of age, education, and employment status.

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1: Comprehensive Review of Literature. . . . . . 1

IPV Health Consequences . . . . . . . 2

Power & Control dynamics . . . . . . . 5

Clinging an abusive relationship . . . . . . 7

Influence of structural features of communities on IPV . . . 8

Intimate Partner Homicide (IPH). . . . . . . 10

CHAPTER 2: Manuscript . . . . . . . 13

Abstract . . . . . . . 14

Introduction . . . . . . . 15

Methods . . . . . . . 24

Results . . . . . . . 26

Discussion . . . . . . . 31

Conclusion . . . . . . . 34

References . . . . . . . 35

Table 1. Sociodemographic characteristics of IPH victims, Georgia, 2014 . 26

Table 2. Proportion of femicides by County. Georgia 2014 . . . 29

Figure 1.Age Distribution of femicide by intimate partner and non-intimate

partner, Georgia 2014 . 27

Figure 2.Distribution of age group among race. Femicides, Georgia 2014 . 28

CHAPTER 3: Public Health Implications . . . . . 38

REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . 40

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