Evaluation of community and household level needs assessment and the association between displacement status and food and water availability in a post-conflict setting - Jaffna, Sri Lanka, 2009 Open Access

Singh, Vidisha (2016)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/2514nk68h?locale=en
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Abstract

May 2009 marked the end of the 26-year long Sri Lankan civil war that led to the displacement of more than 800,000 persons, especially in northern districts of the country. The objectives of this study were to validate community-level survey data with that of the household and to determine if there was an association between household displacement and food/water availability among residents of Jaffna District, Sri Lanka. Data were obtained from a 2009 general health and injury survey conducted by CDC. Level of agreement scores between community and household level needs assessment were calculated for six overlapping questions (socio-demographics/basic community characteristics) between 35 community leader (CL) responses and 1356 households. Scores were compared overall, then by individual questions. Data from 1410 households were then used to explore the association between displacement level (currently displaced, recently displaced, and long-term resident) and food availability, as well as displacement level with water availability. The level of agreement score range was 1-6, and 37% of all CLs scored the median of 4 [IQR: 3-5]. Highest agreement was found with ethnicity (83%) and religion (74%). Lowest agreement was found for primary water source (29%). Currently displaced compared with long-term residents (OR=0.5, 95% CI: 0.3, 0.8) and household size of 6 ≥ compared with 1-3 members (OR=1.7, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.5) were significantly associated with inconsistent food availability, controlling for sex and religion. Female heads of household compared with males (OR=1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.8) and Non-Hindus compared with Hindus (OR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.3, 5.1) were significantly associated with inconsistent water availability, controlling for displacement level. While agreement scores suggested the majority of CLs had relatively high knowledge of household needs and demographics, few had knowledge of primary water source. The association between displacement status and food availability suggested that those living in IDP camps had better food availability compared to long-term residents. Although classified as having reintegration into the community, long-term residents may not have achieved truly sustainable access to food. Valid community level data will better reflect household level needs, thus providing useful data for key stakeholders to respond appropriately during acute emergencies.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
CHAPTER I .......................................................................................................1
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................1
Complex Humanitarian Emergencies .......................................................................1
Internally Displaced Persons ................................................................................1
Important Consequences of Displacement ..............................................................3
Response to CHE: Rapid Needs Assessments ..........................................................4
Case of Jaffna, Sri Lanka.....................................................................................5
Study Objectives ..............................................................................................8
LITERATURE REVIEW ..........................................................................................9
Evolution of Rapid Needs Assessments...................................................................9
Commonly Used Assessment Tools........................................................................11
Previous Assessments: Displacement and Food/Water Supply....................................14
Needs Assessments in Sri Lanka...........................................................................16
CHAPTER II: MANUSCRIPT...................................................................................18
A. Introduction..................................................................................................19
B. Methods.......................................................................................................20
C. Results.........................................................................................................28
D. Discussion.....................................................................................................32
E. References....................................................................................................35
F. Figures.........................................................................................................40
G. Tables..........................................................................................................43
Chapter III: Conclusion........................................................................................46
Appendices........................................................................................................48

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