A Multilevel Model of Longitudinal Non-response: Implications for Studies of College Student Substance Use Open Access

McDonald, Bennett (2016)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/1r66j160d?locale=en
Published

Abstract

Background: Methodologically, unit non-response in longitudinal studies poses
challenges in obtaining unbiased measures of prevalence and association. Differential
non-response due to measured respondent characteristics should be explored to best
correct for this bias in analysis of further waves.
Methods: We examined individual and institutional level predictors of unit non-response
between waves 1 and 2 of a multi-wave longitudinal study of student tobacco and
substance use using multilevel modeling. The sample constituted 3,418 college students aged
18-25 from 7 Georgia colleges/universities.
Results: 450 (12.9%) participants were lost to follow up at wave 2. Multilevel model results
indicated the odds of non-response at wave 2 were higher for males, Blacks, those living off campus,
those with lower academic motivation, and those who used tobacco within the past 30 days. At the
institutional level, the odds of non-response were higher for those attending private colleges/universities
and those attending schools with student populations fewer than 10,000.
Discussion: Future longitudinal studies should assess predictors of non-response between
waves to allow for correction of selection bias due to differential non-response.
Techniques, such as the use of propensity scores, can then be used to correct for selection
bias.

Table of Contents

Introduction....................................................................................................................1
Methods.........................................................................................................................4
Results...........................................................................................................................8
Discussion.....................................................................................................................11
References....................................................................................................................15
Tables……………………........................................................................................................19

About this Master's Thesis

Rights statement
  • Permission granted by the author to include this thesis or dissertation in this repository. All rights reserved by the author. Please contact the author for information regarding the reproduction and use of this thesis or dissertation.
School
Department
Degree
Submission
Language
  • English
Research field
Keyword
Committee Chair / Thesis Advisor
Committee Members
Partnering Agencies
Last modified

Primary PDF

Supplemental Files