Id Genes role in Chordamesoderm and Notochord Development in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Restricted; Files Only

Buksbaum, Joshua Rory (Spring 2019)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/1n79h519n?locale=en
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Abstract

Notochord development is essential for chordate development and viability. The notochord develops from the chordamesoderm a population of proliferating stem cells in the tail bud region. We have previously shown that both BMP and Nodal signals are essential to maintaining the proliferative state of the tail bud, and ensuring proper notochord development. Id or inhibitor of differentiation genes are known regulators of proliferation and differentiaon. There are three id genes expressed in the zebrafish notochord and chordamesoderm. We hypothesized that these Id genes play an integral role in this process by integrating BMP and Nodal signals to facilitate the development of the notochord. We used antisense morpholine oligonucleotide to inhibit the expression of Id2a and Id3 in developing zebrafish embryos. The results of these experiments were visualized with RNA insitu hybridizations. Our initial live photographs suggested that morpholino injections were responsible for producing a consistent phenotype of axial shortening and possibly disrupting the maintenance of the tail bud. However, in situ hybridizations did not show disturbed notochord development or tail bud proliferation, and thus didn’t resemble our earlier work with BMP and Nodal signaling. Further work is necessary to determine the cause of the phenotypic appearance of the injected embryos, and why we did not see a disturbance of notochord and tail bud signaling similar to our work with BMP and Nodal signaling. 

Table of Contents

Background and Introduction….. 1

Methods ……………………….. 4

Results ………………………. ...5

Discussion …………………….. 7

Figures ………………………. ..10

References ……………………. 17

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