New Imperialism’s Role in the Development of the Science Fiction Genre: Race and Gender translation missing: es.hyrax.visibility.files_restricted.text

Tawil, Michelle (Spring 2018)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/0k225b05z?locale=es
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Abstract

This inquiry examines the development of the science fiction (sf) genre and its relationship to New Imperialism. Using the novels of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, and H. Rider Haggard, this research asserts the inextricable relationship between race and gender in these works. French and British imperial styles are compared, and racial others in Verne’s work, particularly Captain Nemo, are depicted to have agency, unlike those in the British works. The sexuality of imperialism is asserted, as a gendered analysis of imperial fiction is conducted, particularly with Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas and H. Rider Haggard’s She. The historical and cultural contexts during these novels’ writings is reflected in certain imperial features. In addition, the science fiction genre’s origins can be traced in these older works, and certain trends and features are still reflected in sf today. Ultimately, this inquiry asks one to question the origins of the science fiction genre and asserts the value of imperial novels, as they help explain common sf features. Such features are, including but not limited to, metaphors of invasion, technological innovation, and xenophobia in figures like aliens.

Table of Contents

Introduction………………………………………………………………………………….….....1

Chapter One: The Science Fiction Genre…....……………....…………………......…...….......…3

Chapter Two: British Imperialism: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Sign of Four and The Lost World…………………………………………………………………………….……...……......11

Chapter Three: French Imperialism: Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas....………...28

Chapter Four: Gender: H. Rider Haggard’s She…..…………………………………………......44

Conclusion...……………………………………………………………………………….....….57

Works Cited……………………………………………………………………….....………......61

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