Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) as a Potential Predictor of Complementary Medicine Use among Adults: Findings from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Open Access

Bondalapati, Kirsten Seetha (2013)

Permanent URL: https://etd.library.emory.edu/concern/etds/08612p119?locale=en
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Abstract

Background: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic mental disorder that affects 4.3%-4.7% of adults in the U.S. While first-line stimulant medication treatments have short-term benefits, long-term health outcomes are unclear and many adults do not adhere tostimulant medications over time. Complementary medicines, on the other hand, have been found to be used by adults with mental disorders more often than the general population. Objectives: The current study aims to measure national estimates of adult ADHD and their rates of specific, lifetime complementary medicine use. In addition, it aims to test ADHD as a predictor of complementary medicine use, adjusting for socio-demographic variables and depression, anxiety, and insomnia in the last 12 months. Methods: Data was analyzed from 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) dataset, including prevalence estimates of socio-demographics, mental illness, and complementary medicine use. A binary block regression model was employed in order to test the predictive affects of ADHD status on complementary medicine use. Results: Among the 2.9% of adults who reported lifetime ADHD, 68.7% reported any lifetime complementary medicine use. Adults with ADHD were significantly more likely to use any complementary medicine in their lifetime as well as 23 out of 36 specific complementary therapies, compared to adults without ADHD. ADHD was found to be a significant predictor of lifetime complementary medicine use, after adjusting for socio-demographic variables and depression, anxiety, and insomnia in the last 12 months; the odds of using complementary medicine was 1.68 times greater among adults with ADHD compared to adults without ADHD. Conclusions: Adults with ADHD were more likely to use complementary medicine in their lifetime compared to adults without ADHD. Adults with ADHD were significantly more likely to report co-morbid depression, anxiety, and insomnia compared to adults without ADHD. Lastly, ADHD was a significant predictor of complementary medicine use. Future research should replicate the current findings using clinical measures of mental illness and explore motivations for complementary medicine use among adults with ADHD in order to better determine treatment seeking behavior among the ADHD population.

Table of Contents

Introduction (1)

Literature Review (5)

Methods (9)

Data & Sampling (9)

Measures (11)

Analysis (14)

Results (15)

Discussion (18)

Reference (26)

Tables (31)

Table 1. Socio-Demographic Differences (31)

Table 2. Complementary Medicine Use (32)

Table 3. Logistic Regression (34)

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