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SUMMATIVE EVALUATION OF A WORKSHOP IN COLLABORATIVE COMMUNICATION

Branscomb, Jane Moreland Collier (2011)
Master's Thesis (119 pages)
Committee Chair / Thesis Adviser: Smith, Iris E
Committee Members: Moe, Cynthia (Sacred Space, Inc);
Research Fields: Health Sciences, Public Health; Health Sciences, Mental Health
Partnering Agencies: Community-based non-profit organization (e.g., AID Atlanta)
Keywords: collaborative communication; evaluation; NVC; Nonviolent Communication; compassion
Program: Rollins School of Public Health, Career Masters of Public Health (Prevention Science)
Permanent url: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/943vb

Abstract


Abstract

SUMMATIVE EVALUATION OF A WORKSHOP IN COLLABORATIVE COMMUNICATION
BY Jane Branscomb

A Collaborative Communication workshop was evaluated for effectiveness in furthering targeted skills, intentions, behaviors and outcomes. Based on Nonviolent Communicationsm (NVC), the workshop seeks to enhance wellbeing by fostering intra- and interpersonal relationships of compassion, connection, collaboration and caring. Evidence indicates that success could also help reduce the burden of depression, suicide, violence, and other concerns.

A repeated measures evaluation addressed: 1) Are participants better able to recognize key distinctions: observations versus evaluations; feelings versus thoughts; needs versus strategies; requests versus demands? 2) Do participants express greater likelihood of applying the tools and principles of NVC; pursuing support for their ongoing practice; seeking additional NVC learning; telling others about NVC tools and principles; teaching NVC? 3) Do participants take action to apply the tools and principles of NVC; to pursue support for their ongoing practice; to pursue additional NVC learning; to tell others about NVC tools and principles? 4) Do participants and their relationships exhibit greater compassion, connection, collaboration and caring?

Seven workshops produced a sample of 108 adults. Clear gains were seen in skills, behavioral intentions and action-taking. A majority of participants were more often showing appreciation and concern for others and expressing themselves without criticism, blame or pressure. By six weeks, ten
percent of those who had not engaged previously in formal practice support had done so; 50 percent of participants had engaged in either formal or informal support; and 57 percent had pursued further NVC learning. Those who undertook follow-up activity showed broader gains than those who did not. Changes in outcome attributes were barely detectable, if at all. Recommendations are made regarding target audiences, marketing, course emphasis and further study.


SUMMATIVE EVALUATION OF A WORKSHOP IN COLLABORATIVE COMMUNICATION
BY

Jane Branscomb
M.P.H., Emory University, 2011
B.E., Vanderbilt University, 1979
Thesis Committee Chair: Iris E. Smith, Ph.D., M.P.H.
A Thesis submitted to the Faculty of the
Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University
in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of
Master of Public Health in the Career MPH program
2011

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application/pdf Dissertation/Thesis 119 pages (2.3 MB) [Access copy of Dissertation/Thesis]
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