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PREVALENCE OF AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SELF-REPORTED HEPATITIS B VACCINATION AMONG HIV-NEGATIVE MSM PARTICIPATING IN AN ONLINE SEXUAL HEALTH SURVEY

Matthews, Jonathan E (2011)
Master's Thesis (126 pages)
Committee Chair / Thesis Adviser: Sullivan, Patrick S
Committee Members:
Research Fields: Health Sciences, Epidemiology; Health Sciences, Public Health
Partnering Agencies: Does not apply (no collaborating organization)
Keywords: vaccination; vaccine; hepatitis B; HBV; men who have sex with men; MSM
Program: Rollins School of Public Health, Epidemiology (Epidemiology)
Permanent url: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/93mkq

Abstract

Objective: We evaluated the prevalence of self-reported hepatitis B vaccination among HIV-
negative men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. We also sought to describe
demographic and behavioral factors associated with vaccination. We also sought to understand
why men who reported not being vaccinated against hepatitis B had not been vaccinated.

Methods: Between October and December 2010, data were collected in an online survey from
MSM over the age of 18 who reported being interested in men on the social networking Internet
sites Facebook and Black Gay Chat. Bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were
employed to determine which factors were significantly associated with self-reported receipt of
hepatitis B vaccination. Descriptive statistics were compiled to characterize why some men
remained unvaccinated.

Results:
Of 1,052 adult MSM who were HIV-negative or who did not know their HIV status and
who reported knowing whether they had ever received a hepatitis B vaccine, 679 (64.5%)
reported being vaccinated against hepatitis B. Multivariate logistic regression modeling
indicated that older age, higher education attainment, having ever been tested for hepatitis B, and
provider-recommended vaccination in the last year were significantly associated with receipt of
vaccination. Nearly 90% of unvaccinated men reported not being vaccinated because they were
never offered a vaccine for hepatitis B, were not aware that a vaccine exists, or did not perceive
themselves to be at increased risk of infection.

Conclusions: A substantial proportion of hepatitis B-negative MSM in the United States remain
unvaccinated against hepatitis B. Although provider-recommended vaccination is strongly
associated with receipt of vaccination among these men, earlier studies suggest that offering of
hepatitis vaccination is higher when providers know that male patients have male sex partners,
and that only about half of MSM disclose their male sex partners to providers. Providers should
ask men who they suspect engage in male-male sexual behavior to share such behavior with
them, and then proceed to vaccinate all susceptible men. In particular, healthcare providers and
health promotion specialists should focus their immunization efforts toward older and more
socioeconomically disadvantaged MSM.

Table of Contents

Introduction..........................................................................................................................1

Methods...............................................................................................................................6
Results...............................................................................................................................12
Discussion...........................................................................................................................17
References..........................................................................................................................28

Files

application/pdf Master's Thesis 126 pages (462 KB) [Access copy of Master's Thesis]
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