print view Emory Login:
(Login to submit or manage theses and dissertations)

About Us

Frequently Asked Questions

ETD Help

Policies and Procedures

Copyright and Patents

Search ETDs:
Advanced Search
Browse by:
Browse ProQuest
Search ProQuest

Laney Graduate School

Emory College

Emory Libraries

"For to End Yet Again": Continuity and Closure in Samuel Beckett's Fizzles

Hager, Stephen R. (2010)
Honors Thesis (-89 pages)
Committee Chair / Thesis Adviser: Gruber, William
Committee Members: Elliott, Christopher Michael ; Williamon, Richard ;
Research Fields: Literature, English
Keywords: Samuel Beckett; Closure; Short Prose; Romanticism;
Program: College Honors Program, English
Permanent url: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/7sjn3

Abstract

This study attempts to explore a seminal yet largely overlooked aspect of Samuel
Beckett's artistic achievement: his shorter prose, with a particular focus on his late collection
Fizzles (1973-75). While often considered to be a series of "failed starts," this study views the
texts not as failures of completion, but rather as willfully undermining the aesthetic norm of
completion and integrality to which most works of literature have historically adhered.
Influenced by the unfinished poems that proliferated during the Romantic Period, such as
Coleridge's "Kubla Khan," Beckett has cultivated an aesthetic expression of incompletion that
suggests that his works should not be seen as distinct, autonomous entities but rather as
fragments of an ongoing project. The incompletion of these works is necessitated by Beckett's
focus on the inherently divisive nature of consciousness. Because memory does not serve as a
means of connecting the consciousness of the present with the memory of the past, these two are
presented within the text as being separate. To end a work that fixates on the inherently
fragmented nature of existence with a conclusive finale would be inappropriate, and this study,
using Barbra Herrnstein Smith's Poetic Closure as a major source of reference, examines how
Beckett manages to attenuate the effects of closure in his works again and again. In so doing, his
works represent the tenacious striving to "end yet again" (Beckett, "8" 246).

Table of Contents

Table of Contents:

Introduction:…………………………………………………………………………………...................1

Chapter 1: The Romantic Legacy in Beckett's Prose Fragments……………………….6

Chapter 2: "Fizzle 1": A Weary Traveler in the Dark………………………………………...16

Chapter 3: Memory and Ruin in "Fizzle 3: Afar a Bird".…………………………………….33

Chapter 4: "For to End Yet Again".………………………………………………....................47

Bibliography:.…………………………………………………………………………………..................66

Files

application/pdf Honors Thesis 75 pages (337.3 KB) [Access copy of Honors Thesis]
Permission granted by the author to include this thesis or dissertation in this repository. All rights reserved by the author. Please contact the author for information regarding the reproduction and use of this thesis or dissertation.